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Identity and environmentalism: the influence of community characteristics

  • Owen, Ann L.
  • Videras, Julio
  • Wu, Stephen

This paper examines the influence of community characteristics on self-proclaimed environmentalism. We find that the composition of a community affects the likelihood that a person claims to be a strong environmentalist, even after controlling for individual characteristics and pro-environment behaviors. Individuals are more likely to definitely agree they are strong environmentalists if they live in areas where a large share of the population has post-graduate degrees and if they live in heavily Democratic areas or heavily Republican areas. These community effects occur only when individuals are predisposed to take on an environmental identity.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/12054/1/MPRA_paper_12054.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 12054.

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Date of creation: 08 Dec 2008
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:12054
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  1. Berrens, Robert P. & Bohara, Alok K. & Jenkins-Smith, Hank C. & Silva, Carol L. & Weimer, David L., 2004. "Information and effort in contingent valuation surveys: application to global climate change using national internet samples," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 331-363, March.
  2. Owen, Ann L. & Videras, Julio & Wu, Stephen, 2008. "More information isn’t always better: the case of voluntary provision of environmental quality," MPRA Paper 11588, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. George A. Akerlof & Rachel E. Kranton, 2000. "Economics And Identity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 115(3), pages 715-753, August.
  4. Matthew J. Kotchen & Michael R. Moore, 2004. "Private Provision of Environmental Public Goods: Household Participation in Green-Electricity Programs," Department of Economics Working Papers 2004-07, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  5. Charles F. Manski, 2000. "Economic Analysis of Social Interactions," NBER Working Papers 7580, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. George A. Akerlof & Rachel E. Kranton, 2005. "Identity and the Economics of Organizations," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(1), pages 9-32, Winter.
  7. Thogersen, John & Olander, Folke, 2002. "Human values and the emergence of a sustainable consumption pattern: A panel study," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 605-630, October.
  8. Erling Holden, 2004. "Towards sustainable consumption: do green households have smaller ecological footprints?," International Journal of Sustainable Development, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 7(1), pages 44-58.
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