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Peer influences and proenvironmental behavior: Panel evidence for the role of regional prevalence and diversity

Author

Listed:
  • Binder, Martin
  • Blankenberg, Ann-Kathrin
  • Welsch, Heinz

Abstract

Pro-environmental behavior depends on the behavior of others. For a UK panel data set, we find that individuals' pro-environmental behavior increases in the behavior of peers in their region. This happens the more so, the greener the self-image of an individual. Diversity of regional green behavior plays a further role, with fractionalization negatively related to pro-environmental behavior and polarization positively so: peer pressure exerts a less strong influence when behaviors are diverse, and a stronger influence when behaviors are very polarized.

Suggested Citation

  • Binder, Martin & Blankenberg, Ann-Kathrin & Welsch, Heinz, 2019. "Peer influences and proenvironmental behavior: Panel evidence for the role of regional prevalence and diversity," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 367, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:cegedp:367
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Farrow, Katherine & Grolleau, Gilles & Ibanez, Lisette, 2017. "Social Norms and Pro-environmental Behavior: A Review of the Evidence," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 140(C), pages 1-13.
    2. repec:eee:ecolec:v:149:y:2018:i:c:p:105-119 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:oup:jeurec:v:15:y:2017:i:2:p:245-295. is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Martin Binder & Ann-Kathrin Blankenberg & Heinz Welsch, 2019. "Pro-environmental norms and subjective well-being: panel evidence from the UK," Working Papers V-417-19, University of Oldenburg, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2019.
    5. repec:eee:jeborg:v:137:y:2017:i:c:p:304-323 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Ann Owen & Julio Videras & Stephen Wu, 2010. "Identity and Environmentalism: The Influence of Community Characteristics," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 68(4), pages 465-486.
    7. Heinz Welsch & Jan K├╝hling, 2016. "Green status seeking and endogenous reference standards," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 18(4), pages 625-643, October.
    8. Daron Acemoglu & Matthew O. Jackson, 2017. "Social Norms and the Enforcement of Laws," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 15(2), pages 245-295.
    9. Sexton, Steven E. & Sexton, Alison L., 2014. "Conspicuous conservation: The Prius halo and willingness to pay for environmental bona fides," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 303-317.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    pro-environmental behavior; peer influence; prevalence; fractionalization; polarization; UKHLS;

    JEL classification:

    • Q53 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Air Pollution; Water Pollution; Noise; Hazardous Waste; Solid Waste; Recycling
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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