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Vom Nutzen afrikanischer Zuwanderer für Europa. Wende in der EU-Einwanderungspolitik?
[On the benefit of African immigration to Europe. Turn in the EU immigration policy?]

  • Kohnert, Dirk

A growing number of Africans flees from their desolate economic situation or violent conflicts and political persecution at home to Europe. The European Union shares responsibil-ity for this growing economic misery, in view of its egoistic external trade policy. Neverthe-less, it intensifies the foreclosure of its external borders. Thereby, the escape routes become even more dangerous, thousands die every year. The European-African migration summits in Rabat and Tripoli in June and November 2006 even strengthened this policy of exclusion. Yet, well adapted immigration regulations would serve the interest of all parties involved. Last, but not least, it could contribute to protect the over-aged population of European mem-ber states in the long run against threatening economic decline. Even Germany and France meanwhile hesitantly accept the fact that they are an immigration country. The EU commis-sion endorses a limited and temporarily restricted immigration of Africans. However, two fundamental problems remain unsolved. Cost and benefit of immigration are distributed asymmetrically between the social classes. In addition, the EU favours the admission of high skilled labour, which tends to strengthen the 'brain drain' from Africa even more, while mil-lions of unskilled irregular migrants compete with the growing army of unemployed in the host countries. Both will aggravate the imminent danger of violent conflicts and of right-wing extremism in the immigration regions.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 1064.

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Date of creation: 06 Dec 2006
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:1064
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  1. Anderson, Kym & Martin, Will & van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique, 2005. "Would multilateral trade reform benefit Sub-Saharan Africans?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3616, The World Bank.
  2. Adams, Richard Jr. & Page, John, 2005. "Do international migration and remittances reduce poverty in developing countries?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1645-1669, October.
  3. Dirk Kohnert, 2006. "Cultures of Innovation of the African Poor. Common Roots, Shared Traits, Joint Prospects? On the Articulation of Multiple Modernities in African Societies and Black Diasporas in Latin America," GIGA Working Paper Series 25, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
  4. John Baffes, 2005. "The "Cotton Problem"," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 20(1), pages 109-144.
  5. Gillson, I & Poulton, Colin & Balcombe, Kelvin & Page, S, 2004. "Understanding the impact of Cotton Subsidies on developing countries," MPRA Paper 15373, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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