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Evaluating the Food for Education Program in Bangladesh

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  • Xin Meng

    ()

  • Jim Ryan

Abstract

The Food for Education (FFE) program was introduced to Bangladesh in 1993 and has been operating for more than 8 years. This paper evaluates the effect of this program on school participation and duration of schooling using household sample survey data collected in 2000. Various evaluation methodologies are employed. We found that the program is successful in that the participating children on average have 20 to 30 per cent higher school participation rates, relative to their counterfactuals who did not participate in the program. Conditional on school participation, participants also stay at school 0.5 of a year to 2 years longer than their counterfactuals. Using estimated earnings functions from the Bangladesh Household Income and Expenditure survey, these combined education effects of the FFE program would represent an increase in lifetime earnings of between 7 and 16 per cent if the participant is going to work in the rural sector, and 13 to 25 per cent if in the urban sector. These increases would bring large numbers of households above the poverty line.

Suggested Citation

  • Xin Meng & Jim Ryan, 2003. "Evaluating the Food for Education Program in Bangladesh," ASARC Working Papers 2003-07, The Australian National University, Australia South Asia Research Centre.
  • Handle: RePEc:pas:asarcc:2003-07
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Richard Blundell & Monica Costa Dias, 2000. "Evaluation methods for non-experimental data," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 21(4), pages 427-468, January.
    2. Psacharopoulos, George, 1994. "Returns to investment in education: A global update," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(9), pages 1325-1343, September.
    3. Skoufias, Emmanuel & McClafferty, Bonnie, 2001. "Is PROGRESA working?," FCND briefs 118, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. World Bank, 2002. "Poverty in Bangladesh : Building on Progress," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15303, The World Bank.
    5. Rajeev H. Dehejia & Sadek Wahba, 2002. "Propensity Score-Matching Methods For Nonexperimental Causal Studies," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(1), pages 151-161, February.
    6. Ahmed, Akhter U. & del Ninno, Carlo, 2002. "The Food For Education program in Bangladesh," FCND discussion papers 138, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Ravallion, Martin & Wodon, Quentin, 2000. "Does Child Labour Displace Schooling? Evidence on Behavioural Responses to an Enrollment Subsidy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 158-175, March.
    8. James J. Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Petra Todd, 1998. "Matching As An Econometric Evaluation Estimator," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 261-294.
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    Cited by:

    1. Eric A. Hanushek, 2008. "Incentives for Efficiency and Equity in the School System," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 9(s1), pages 5-27, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Education; Program Evaluation.;

    JEL classification:

    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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