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Economic Geography, Trade, and War

  • David H. Bearce

    ()

  • Eric O'N. Fisher

    ()

This paper uses computational techniques to explore the relationship between trade and war. It develops and simulates an agent-based model in which trade and military conflict are emergent processes within a system of states. The model explores different initial configurations, and the economic geography evolves endogenously. Simulations of the model show that some of the same factors promoting trade may also engender military conquest, revealing important qualifications to the conventional wisdom that there is an inverse relationship between trade and war.

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File URL: http://econ.ohio-state.edu/efisher/EGTW.PDF
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Paper provided by Ohio State University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 01-06.

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Date of creation: Feb 2001
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Handle: RePEc:osu:osuewp:01-06
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  1. Grieco, Joseph M., 1988. "Anarchy and the limits of cooperation: a realist critique of the newest liberal institutionalism," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 42(03), pages 485-507, June.
  2. Backus, David K & Kehoe, Patrick J & Kydland, Finn E, 1994. "Dynamics of the Trade Balance and the Terms of Trade: The J-Curve?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(1), pages 84-103, March.
  3. Jeffrey A. Frankel, 1993. "Is Japan Creating a Yen Bloc in East Asia and the Pacific?," NBER Chapters, in: Regionalism and Rivalry: Japan and the United States in Pacific Asia, pages 53-88 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Joshua M. Epstein & Robert L. Axtell, 1996. "Growing Artificial Societies: Social Science from the Bottom Up," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262550253, June.
  5. Hirshleifer, Jack, 1995. "Anarchy and Its Breakdown," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(1), pages 26-52, February.
  6. John J. Wallis & Douglass North, 1986. "Measuring the Transaction Sector in the American Economy, 1870-1970," NBER Chapters, in: Long-Term Factors in American Economic Growth, pages 95-162 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Kenneth L. Judd, 1998. "Numerical Methods in Economics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262100711, June.
  8. Fearon, James D., 1995. "Rationalist explanations for war," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 49(03), pages 379-414, June.
  9. Buzan, Barry, 1984. "Economic structure and international security: the limits of the liberal Case," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 38(04), pages 597-624, September.
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