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Growth effect of bubbles in a non-scale endogenous growth model with in-house R&D

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  • Kizuku Takao

    () (Graduate School of Economics, Osaka University)

Abstract

This paper provides a theoretical explanation for why the presence of asset bubbles can lead to higher economic growth in concurrence with high consumption by using a simple endogenous growth model. In the model economy, long-lived valuemaximizing firms continuously improve the quality of their specific products through in-house R&D, while at the same time new firms also enter into the market. Due to an absence of intergenerational altruism, asset bubbles can exist as pyramid schemes whose value is not backed by fundamental value. The presence of asset bubbles then leads to higher interest rates. This requires product proliferation to be impeded, which would result in an increase in the demand for differentiated goods at the level of an individual firm. A larger scale of production at the level of an individual firm can encourage in-house R&D of firms and promote economic growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Kizuku Takao, 2014. "Growth effect of bubbles in a non-scale endogenous growth model with in-house R&D," Discussion Papers in Economics and Business 14-11, Osaka University, Graduate School of Economics and Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP).
  • Handle: RePEc:osk:wpaper:1411
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    File URL: http://www2.econ.osaka-u.ac.jp/library/global/dp/1411.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Benhabib Jess & Perli Roberto, 1994. "Uniqueness and Indeterminacy: On the Dynamics of Endogenous Growth," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 113-142, June.
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    13. Joonkyung Ha & Peter Howitt, 2007. "Accounting for Trends in Productivity and R&D: A Schumpeterian Critique of Semi-Endogenous Growth Theory," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(4), pages 733-774, June.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bubbles; R&D; Overlapping generations;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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