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Fresh perspectives on unobservable variables: Data decomposition of the Kalman smoother

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Macroeconomics makes extensive use of concepts for which there are no observed data. Empirical estimates of such unobservable variables - core inflation is one example - have to be estimated from observed data. The data decomposition tool helps identify the contribution of each piece of observed data to the estimate of the unobservable variable.

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  • Nicholas Sander, 2013. "Fresh perspectives on unobservable variables: Data decomposition of the Kalman smoother," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Analytical Notes series AN2013/09, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  • Handle: RePEc:nzb:nzbans:2013/09
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    14. Michael Kirker, 2010. "What drives core inflation? A dynamic factor model analysis of tradable and nontradable prices," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2010/13, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
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