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The Currency Denomination Of Sovereign Debt

  • Michael Bleaney
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    This paper considers the currency composition of sovereign debt in the context of risk-sharing through excusable defaults. It is shown that monetary credibility is not a sufficient condition for borrowing in domestic currency. With real exchange rate risk, debt denominated in a borrowing country’s currency can be too state-contingent to support international lending on purely reputational considerations, even when debt denominated in the lending country’s currency is viable. The model can explain the geographical pattern of bond issuance, the phenomenon of “original sin”, and the concentration of defaults on foreign-currency debt.

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    File URL: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/economics/documents/discussion-papers/06-02.pdf
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    Paper provided by University of Nottingham, School of Economics in its series Discussion Papers with number 06/02.

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    Handle: RePEc:not:notecp:06/02
    Contact details of provider: Postal: School of Economics University of Nottingham University Park Nottingham NG7 2RD
    Phone: (44) 0115 951 5620
    Fax: (0115) 951 4159
    Web page: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/economics/

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    1. Axel Schimmelpfennig & Nouriel Roubini & Paolo Manasse, 2003. "Predicting Sovereign Debt Crises," IMF Working Papers 03/221, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Grossman, Herschel I & Van Huyck, John B, 1988. "Sovereign Debt as a Contingent Claim: Excusable Default, Repudiation, and Reputation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(5), pages 1088-97, December.
    3. Barry Eichengreen & Ricardo Hausmann, 1999. "Exchange Rates and Financial Fragility," NBER Working Papers 7418, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Harold L. Cole & Patrick J. Kehoe, 1994. "The role of institutions in reputation models of sovereign debt," Staff Report 179, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    5. Alfaro, Laura & Kanczuk, Fabio, 2005. "Sovereign debt as a contingent claim: a quantitative approach," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 297-314, March.
    6. Herschel I. Grossman & Taejoon Han, 1997. "Sovereign Debt and Consumption Smoothing," NBER Working Papers 5997, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Hausmann, Ricardo & Panizza, Ugo, 2003. "On the determinants of Original Sin: an empirical investigation," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(7), pages 957-990, December.
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