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Catalysts And Magnets: Built Environment Effects On Bicycle Commuting

Author

Listed:
  • Jessica Schoner
  • Xinyu (Jason) Cao
  • David Levinson

    () (Nexus (Networks, Economics, and Urban Systems) Research Group, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minnesota)

Abstract

What effects do bicycle infrastructure and the built environment have on people’s decisions to commute by bicycle? While many studies have considered this question, commonly employed methodologies fail to address the unique statistical challenge of modeling such a low mode share. Additionally, self selection effects that are not adequately accounted for may lead to overestimation of built environment impacts. This study addresses these two key issues by using a zero-inflated negative binomial model to jointly estimate participation in and frequency of commuting by bicycle, controlling for demographics, residential preferences, and travel attitudes. The findings suggest a strong self-selection effect and modest contributions of bicycle accessibility: that bicycle lanes act as “magnets" to attract bicyclists to a neighborhood, rather than being the “catalyst" that encourages non-bikers to shift modes. The results have implications for planners and policymakers attempting to increase bicycling mode share via the strategic infrastructure development.

Suggested Citation

  • Jessica Schoner & Xinyu (Jason) Cao & David Levinson, 2013. "Catalysts And Magnets: Built Environment Effects On Bicycle Commuting," Working Papers 000116, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:nex:wpaper:catalystsandmagnets
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11299/180052
    File Function: Second version, 2015
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mokhtarian, Patricia L. & Cao, Xinyu, 2008. "Examining the impacts of residential self-selection on travel behavior: A focus on methodologies," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 42(3), pages 204-228, March.
    2. Lothlorien Redmond & Patricia Mokhtarian, 2001. "The positive utility of the commute: modeling ideal commute time and relative desired commute amount," Transportation, Springer, vol. 28(2), pages 179-205, May.
    3. Xing, Yan & Handy, Susan L. & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 2010. "Factors Associated with Proportions and Miles of Bicycling for Transportation and Recreation in Six Small U.S. Cities," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt74n4j1p0, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Wang, Jueyu & Lindsey, Greg, 2019. "Neighborhood socio-demographic characteristics and bike share member patterns of use," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 1-1.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    travel behavior; bicycling; housing choice; self-selection;

    JEL classification:

    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand
    • R42 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government and Private Investment Analysis; Road Maintenance; Transportation Planning

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