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Political Ideology and Endogenous Trade Policy: An Empirical Investigation

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  • Pushan Dutt
  • Devashish Mitra

Abstract

In this paper, we empirically investigate how government ideology affects trade policy. The prediction of a partisan, ideology-based model (within a two-sector, two-factor Heckscher-Ohlin framework) is that left-wing governments will adopt more protectionist trade policies in capital rich countries, but adopt more pro-trade policies in labor rich economies than right-wing ones. The data strongly support this prediction in a very robust fashion. There is some evidence, that this relationship may hold better in democracies than in dictatorships though the magnitude of the partisan effect seems stronger in dictatorships.

Suggested Citation

  • Pushan Dutt & Devashish Mitra, 2002. "Political Ideology and Endogenous Trade Policy: An Empirical Investigation," NBER Working Papers 9239, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:9239
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    1. Kishore Gawande & Usree Bandyopadhyay, 2000. "Is Protection for Sale? Evidence on the Grossman-Helpman Theory of Endogenous Protection," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(1), pages 139-152, February.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • F11 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Neoclassical Models of Trade

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