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Home Bias in Portfolios and Taxation of Asset Income

Listed author(s):
  • Roger Gordon
  • Vitor Gaspar

Intuitively, the observed 'home bias' in individual portfolios plausibly explains the international capital immobility in aggregate data reported by Feldstein and Horioka (1980) as well as the survival of taxes on capital income. These intuitions are examined explicitly in a model where random consumer prices cause individuals to invest heavily in domestic equity as a hedge against these price fluctuations. Neither intuition is fully supported by the model. While the model forecasts that extra domestic savings generate extra investment primarily in the home country, consistent with the evidence in Feldstein and Horioka, this is true regardless of whether consumer price are random and so whether portfolios have 'home bias.' In addition, while random equity returns facilitate taxes on equity income, as shown in Gordon and Varian (1989) and Huizinga and Nielsen (1997), random consumer prices appear to undermine taxes on capital income.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w8193.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 8193.

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Date of creation: Mar 2001
Publication status: published as Roger Gordon & Vitor Gaspar, 2001. "Home Bias in Portfolios and Taxation of Asset Income," Advances in Economic Analysis & Policy, Berkeley Electronic Press, vol. 1(advances/), pages 1001-1001.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:8193
Note: IFM PE
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  1. Gordon, Roger H. & Varian, Hal R., 1989. "Taxation of asset income in the presence of a world securities market," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3-4), pages 205-226, May.
  2. Huizinga, Harry & Nielsen, Soren Bo, 1997. "Capital income and profit taxation with foreign ownership of firms," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 149-165, February.
  3. Razin, Assaf & Sadka, Efraim, 1991. "International tax competition and gains from tax harmonization," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 69-76, September.
  4. Hartley, Peter, 1986. "Portfolio Theory and Foreign Investment--The Role of Non-marketed Assets," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 62(178), pages 286-295, September.
  5. Adler, Michael & Dumas, Bernard, 1983. " International Portfolio Choice and Corporation Finance: A Synthesis," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 38(3), pages 925-984, June.
  6. Bottazzi, Laura & Pesenti, Paolo & van Wincoop, Eric, 1996. "Wages, profits and the international portfolio puzzle," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 219-254, February.
  7. Feldstein, Martin & Horioka, Charles, 1980. "Domestic Saving and International Capital Flows," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 90(358), pages 314-329, June.
  8. French, Kenneth R & Poterba, James M, 1991. "Investor Diversification and International Equity Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 222-226, May.
  9. Diamond, Peter A & Mirrlees, James A, 1971. "Optimal Taxation and Public Production: I--Production Efficiency," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 61(1), pages 8-27, March.
  10. Paul R. Krugman, 1981. "Consumption Preferences, Asset Demands, and Distribution Effects in International Financial Markets," NBER Working Papers 0651, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Eldor, Rafael & Pines, David & Schwartz, Abba, 1988. "Home asset preference and productivity shocks," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1-2), pages 165-176, August.
  12. Gordon, Roger H, 1986. "Taxation of Investment and Savings in a World Economy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(5), pages 1086-1102, December.
  13. Paolo Pesenti & Eric van Wincoop, 1996. "Do Nontraded Goods Explain the Home Bias Puzzle?," NBER Working Papers 5784, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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