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Climate Policy under Cooperation and Competition between Regions with Spatial Heat Transport

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  • Yongyang Cai
  • William Brock
  • Anastasios Xepapadeas
  • Kenneth Judd

Abstract

We build a novel stochastic dynamic regional integrated assessment model (IAM) of the climate and economic system including a number of important climate science elements that are missing in most IAMs. These elements are spatial heat transport from the Equator to the Poles, sea level rise, permafrost thaw and tipping points. We study optimal policies under cooperation and noncooperation between two regions (the North and the Tropic-South) in the face of risks and recursive utility. We introduce a new general computational algorithm to find feedback Nash equilibrium. Our results suggest that when the elements of climate science are ignored, important policy variables such as the optimal regional carbon tax and adaptation could be seriously biased. We also find the regional carbon tax is significantly smaller in the feedback Nash equilibrium than in the social planner’s problem in each region, and the North has higher carbon taxes than the Tropic-South.

Suggested Citation

  • Yongyang Cai & William Brock & Anastasios Xepapadeas & Kenneth Judd, 2018. "Climate Policy under Cooperation and Competition between Regions with Spatial Heat Transport," NBER Working Papers 24473, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:24473
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    Cited by:

    1. Laurence Kotlikoff & Felix Kubler & Andrey Polbin & Jeffrey Sachs & Simon Scheidegger, 2021. "Making Carbon Taxation A Generational Win Win," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 62(1), pages 3-46, February.
    2. Laurence J. Kotlikoff & Felix Kubler & Andrey Polbin & Simon Scheidegger, 2020. "Pareto-Improving Carbon-Risk Taxation," NBER Working Papers 26919, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Baldwin, Elizabeth & Cai, Yongyang & Kuralbayeva, Karlygash, 2020. "To build or not to build? Capital stocks and climate policy∗," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 100(C).
    4. William Brock & Anastasios Xepapadeas, 2019. "Regional Climate Policy under Deep Uncertainty," DEOS Working Papers 1901, Athens University of Economics and Business.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q58 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environmental Economics: Government Policy

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