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China's Gradualistic Economic Approach and Financial Markets

Author

Listed:
  • Markus K. Brunnermeier
  • Michael Sockin
  • Wei Xiong

Abstract

China’s gradualistic approach allowed the government to learn how the economy reacts to small policy changes, and to adjust its reforms before implementing them in full. With fully developed financial markets, however, private actors’ may front-run future policy changes making it impossible for the implement policies gradually. With financial markets the government faces a time-inconsistency problem. The government would like to commit to a gradualistic approach, but after it observes the economy’s quick reaction, it has no incentive to implement its policies in small steps.

Suggested Citation

  • Markus K. Brunnermeier & Michael Sockin & Wei Xiong, 2017. "China's Gradualistic Economic Approach and Financial Markets," NBER Working Papers 23194, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23194
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Yi Huang & Marco Pagano & Ugo Panizza, 2016. "Public Debt and Private Firm Funding: Evidence from Chinese Cities," IHEID Working Papers 10-2016, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies, revised Aug 2016.
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    4. Yi Huang & Marco Pagano & Ug Panizza, 2016. "Local Crowding Out in China," CSEF Working Papers 450, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy, revised 13 Nov 2017.
    5. Chen, Kaiji & Ren, Jue & Zha, Tao, 2016. "What we learn from China's rising shadow banking: exploring the nexus of monetary tightening and banks' role in entrusted lending," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2016-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    6. Kydland, Finn E & Prescott, Edward C, 1977. "Rules Rather Than Discretion: The Inconsistency of Optimal Plans," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(3), pages 473-491, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yi Huang & Ugo Panizza & Richard Portes, 2018. "Corporate Foreign Bond Issuance and Interfirm Loans in China," NBER Working Papers 24513, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Randall Morck & Bernard Yeung, 2017. "East Asian Financial and Economic Development," Working Papers id:12112, eSocialSciences.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)

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