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Heterogeneous Frictional Costs Across Industries in Cross-border Mergers and Acquisitions

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  • Bruce A. Blonigen
  • Donghyun Lee

Abstract

While there has been significant research to explore the determinants (and frictions) of foreign direct investment (FDI), past literature primarily focuses on country-wide FDI patterns with little examination of sectoral heterogeneity in FDI. Anecdotally, there is substantial sectoral heterogeneity in FDI patterns. For example, a substantial share of FDI (around 40-50%) is in the manufacturing sector, yet manufacturing accounts for a relatively small share of production activity in the developed economies responsible for most cross-border M&A. In this paper, we extend the Head and Ries (2008) model of cross-border M&A to account for sectoral heterogeneity and estimate the varying effects of FDI frictions across sectors using cross-border M&A data spanning 1985 through 2013. We find that non-manufacturing sectors generally have greater sensitivity to cross-border M&A frictions than is true for manufacturing, including such frictions as physical distance, cultural distance, and common language. Tradeability is positively associated with greater cross-border M&A, and is an additional friction for the many non-manufacturing sectors because they consist of mainly non-tradeable goods.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruce A. Blonigen & Donghyun Lee, 2016. "Heterogeneous Frictional Costs Across Industries in Cross-border Mergers and Acquisitions," NBER Working Papers 22546, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:22546
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hijzen, Alexander & Görg, Holger & Manchin, Miriam, 2008. "Cross-border mergers and acquisitions and the role of trade costs," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(5), pages 849-866, July.
    2. Sebastian Krautheim, 2013. "Export-supporting FDI," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 46(4), pages 1571-1605, November.
    3. di Giovanni, Julian, 2005. "What drives capital flows? The case of cross-border M&A activity and financial deepening," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(1), pages 127-149, January.
    4. Jörn Kleinert & Farid Toubal, 2013. "Production versus distribution-oriented FDI," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 149(3), pages 423-442, September.
    5. Gabriel Felbermayr & Benjamin Jung, 2011. "Trade Intermediation and the Organization of Exporters," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(4), pages 634-648, September.
    6. Bruce Kogut & Harbir Singh, 1988. "The Effect of National Culture on the Choice of Entry Mode," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 19(3), pages 411-432, September.
    7. Gabriel Felbermayr & Benjamin Jung, 2011. "Trade Intermediation and the Organization of Exporters," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(4), pages 634-648, September.
    8. Piero Morosini & Scott Shane & Harbir Singh, 1998. "National Cultural Distance and Cross-Border Acquisition Performance," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 29(1), pages 137-158, March.
    9. Rossi, Stefano & Volpin, Paolo F., 2004. "Cross-country determinants of mergers and acquisitions," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 277-304, November.
    10. Head, Keith & Ries, John, 2008. "FDI as an outcome of the market for corporate control: Theory and evidence," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 2-20, January.
    11. Bala Ramasamy & Matthew Yeung, 2010. "The Determinants of Foreign Direct Investment in Services," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(4), pages 573-596, April.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D22 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Empirical Analysis
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • G34 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Mergers; Acquisitions; Restructuring; Corporate Governance
    • L22 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Organization and Market Structure

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