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The Geography of Trade and Technology Shocks in the United States

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  • David H. Autor
  • David Dorn
  • Gordon H. Hanson

Abstract

This paper explores the geographic overlap of trade and technology shocks across local labor markets in the United States. Regional exposure to technological change, as measured by specialization in routine task-intensive production and clerical occupations, is largely uncorrelated with regional exposure to trade competition from China. While the impacts of technology are present throughout the United States, the impacts of trade tend to be more geographically concentrated, owing in part to the spatial agglomeration of labor-intensive manufacturing. Our findings suggest that it should be possible to separately identify the impacts of recent changes in trade and technology on U.S. regional economies.

Suggested Citation

  • David H. Autor & David Dorn & Gordon H. Hanson, 2013. "The Geography of Trade and Technology Shocks in the United States," NBER Working Papers 18940, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18940
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David H. Autor & Frank Levy & Richard J. Murnane, 2003. "The skill content of recent technological change: an empirical exploration," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Nov.
    2. Oldenski, Lindsay, 2012. "Export Versus FDI and the Communication of Complex Information," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 312-322.
    3. Firpo, Sergio & Fortin, Nicole M. & Lemieux, Thomas, 2011. "Occupational Tasks and Changes in the Wage Structure," IZA Discussion Papers 5542, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Christian Dustmann & Johannes Ludsteck & Uta Schönberg, 2009. "Revisiting the German Wage Structure," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(2), pages 843-881.
    5. Barry Naughton, 2007. "The Chinese Economy: Transitions and Growth," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262640643, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Drivas, Kyriakos & Economidou, Claire & Karkalakos, Sotiris & Tsionas, Efthymios G., 2016. "Mobility of knowledge and local innovation activity," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 39-61.
    2. Francesco Vona & Giovanni Marin & Davide Consoli & David Popp, 2015. "Green Skills," CESifo Working Paper Series 5323, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Nicholas Bloom & Paul M. Romer & Stephen J. Terry & John Van Reenen, 2013. "A Trapped-Factors Model of Innovation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(3), pages 208-213, May.
    4. Gould, Eric D, 2015. "Explaining the Unexplained: Residual Wage Inequality, Manufacturing Decline, and Low-Skilled Immigration," CEPR Discussion Papers 10649, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Francesco Vona & G. Marin & D. Consoli, 2016. "Measures, Drivers and Effects of Green Employment : evidence from US local Labor Markets, 2006-2014," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2016-22, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    6. Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan & Olfert, M. Rose & Tan, Ying, 2013. "International Trade and Local Labor Markets: Are Foreign and Domestic Shocks Created Differently?," MPRA Paper 53407, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Luisa Gagliardi, 2014. "Employment and Technological Change: On the Geography of Labour Market Adjustments," SERC Discussion Papers 0165, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    8. Gagliardi, Luisa & Iammarino, Simona & Rodríguez-Pose, Andrés, 2015. "Offshoring and the Geography of Jobs in Great Britain," CEPR Discussion Papers 10855, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Michael Peters & Fabian Eckert, 2016. "Urbanization, Growth and Structural Change," 2016 Meeting Papers 774, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    10. Kourtellos, Andros & Marr, Christa & Tan, Chih Ming, 2016. "Robust determinants of intergenerational mobility in the land of opportunity," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 132-147.
    11. M. Goos & Jozef Konings & Marieke Vanderweyer, 2015. "Employment Growth in Europe:The Roles of Innovation, Local Job Multipliers and Institutions," Working Papers 15-10, Utrecht School of Economics.
    12. Paul Gaggl & Greg C. Wright, 2017. "A Short-Run View of What Computers Do: Evidence from a UK Tax Incentive," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 262-294, July.
    13. Nuarpear Lekfuangfu, 2017. "Intensive and Extensive Margins of Labour Supply in Thailand: Decomposing the Pattern of Work Behaviours," PIER Discussion Papers 59, Puey Ungphakorn Institute for Economic Research, revised May 2017.
    14. repec:eee:rensus:v:77:y:2017:i:c:p:1261-1271 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Böckerman, Petri & Laaksonen, Seppo & Vainiomäki, Jari, 2016. "Are Jobs More Polarized in ICT Firms?," IZA Discussion Papers 9851, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    16. Davide Consoli & Mabel Sánchez-Barrioluengo, 2016. "Polarization and the growth of low-skill employment in Spanish Local Labor Markets," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1628, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Nov 2016.
    17. repec:esx:essedp:752 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights
    • R1 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics

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