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Education and the Prevalence of Pain

  • Steven J. Atlas
  • Jonathan S. Skinner

Many Americans report chronic and disabling pain, even in the absence of identifiable clinical disorders. We first examine the prevalence of pain in the older U.S. population using the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Among 50-59 year females, for example, pain rates ranged from 26 percent for college graduates to 55 percent for those without a high school degree. Occupation, industry, and marital status attenuated but did not erase these educational gradients. Second, we used a study of patients with lower back pain and sciatica arising from intervertebral disk herniation (IDH). Initially, nearly all patients reported considerable pain and discomfort, with a sizeable fraction undergoing surgery for their IDH. However, baseline severity measures and surgical or medical treatment explained little of the variation in 10-year outcomes. By contrast, education exerted a strong impact on changes over time in pain: just 9 percent of college graduates report leg or back pain "always" or "almost always" after 10 years, compared to 34 percent for people without a high school degree. This close association of education with pain is consistent with recent research emphasizing the importance of neurological -- and perhaps economic -- factors in the perception of pain.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 14964.

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Date of creation: May 2009
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Publication status: published as Education and the Prevalence of Pain , Steven J. Atlas, Jonathan Skinner. in Research Findings in the Economics of Aging , Wise. 2010
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:14964
Note: AG HC HE
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