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Bringing Science to Market: Commercializing from NIH SBIR Awards

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  • Albert N. Link
  • Christopher J. Ruhm

Abstract

We offer empirical information on the correlates of commercialization activity for research projects funded through the U.S. National Institutes of Health's (NIH's) Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) award program. Based on this analysis we suggest possible recommendations for improving this aspect of the performance of NIH's SBIR program. Specifically, we estimate a model of the probability of commercialization as a function of the project's ability to attract additional developmental funding, along with other control variables. We find that additional developmental funding from non-SBIR federal sources and from own internal sources are important predictors of commercialization success, relatively more so than additional developmental funding from venture capitalists. We also find, among other things, that university involvement in the underlying research increases the probability of commercialization. Thus, these factors should be considered by NIH when making awards, if increased commercialization is an objective.

Suggested Citation

  • Albert N. Link & Christopher J. Ruhm, 2008. "Bringing Science to Market: Commercializing from NIH SBIR Awards," NBER Working Papers 14057, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:14057
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    Cited by:

    1. David B. Audretsch & Dennis P. Leyden & Albert N. Link, 2013. "Universities as research partners in publicly supported entrepreneurial firms," Chapters,in: Public Support of Innovation in Entrepreneurial Firms, chapter 12, pages 175-192 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Cunningham, James & Link, Albert, 2014. "Fostering University‐Industry R&D Collaborations in European Union Countries," UNCG Economics Working Papers 14-3, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.
    3. Drivas, Kyriakos & Economidou, Claire & Karamanis, Dimitris & Zank, Arleen, 2014. "Academic Patents and Technology Transfer," MPRA Paper 57476, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Albert N. Link & Christopher J. Ruhm & Donald S. Siegel, 2014. "Private Equity and the Innovation Strategies of Entrepreneurial Firms: Empirical Evidence from the Small Business Innovation Research Program," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 35(2), pages 103-113, March.
    5. Albert N. Link & John T. Scott, 2013. "Governments as entrepreneur: Evaluating the commercialization success of SBIR projects," Chapters,in: Public Support of Innovation in Entrepreneurial Firms, chapter 2, pages 25-38 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Hall, Michael & Link, Albert, 2015. "Technology-Based Growth Policies: The Case of North Carolina’s Green Business Fund," UNCG Economics Working Papers 15-1, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.
    7. Albert N. Link & Christopher J. Ruhm, 2013. "Public knowledge, private knowledge: the intellectual capital of entrepreneurs," Chapters,in: Public Support of Innovation in Entrepreneurial Firms, chapter 7, pages 113-126 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Martin S. Andersen & Jeremy W. Bray & Albert N. Link, 2017. "On the failure of scientific research: an analysis of SBIR projects funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 112(1), pages 431-442, July.
    9. Rajeev Goel & Devrim Göktepe-Hultén & Rati Ram, 2015. "Academics’ entrepreneurship propensities and gender differences," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 161-177, February.
    10. Barry Bozeman & Albert N. Link, 2015. "Toward an assessment of impacts from US technology and innovation policies," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 42(3), pages 369-376.
    11. Christopher Hayter, 2015. "Public or private entrepreneurship? Revisiting motivations and definitions of success among academic entrepreneurs," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 40(6), pages 1003-1015, December.
    12. Stuart D. Allen & Stephen K. Layson & Albert N. Link, 2013. "Public gains from entrepreneurial research: Inferences about the economic value of public support of the Small Business Innovation Research program," Chapters,in: Public Support of Innovation in Entrepreneurial Firms, chapter 6, pages 105-112 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    13. repec:kap:jtecht:v:42:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s10961-016-9470-y is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Vijayaraghavan, K. & Dutz, Mark A., 2012. "Biotechnology innovation for inclusive growth : a study of Indian policies to foster accelerated technology adaptation for affordable development," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6022, The World Bank.
    15. Sara, Amoroso & Albert, Link, 2017. "Under the AEGIS∗ of knowledge intensive entrepreneurship: Employment growth and gender of founders among European Firms," UNCG Economics Working Papers 17-9, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.
    16. Christopher S. Hayter, 2016. "A trajectory of early-stage spinoff success: the role of knowledge intermediaries within an entrepreneurial university ecosystem," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 47(3), pages 633-656, October.
    17. Dennis Patrick Leyden, 2016. "Universities as partners in research joint ventures," Economia e Politica Industriale: Journal of Industrial and Business Economics, Springer;Associazione Amici di Economia e Politica Industriale, vol. 43(4), pages 449-462, December.
    18. Donald Siegel & Charles Wessner, 2012. "Universities and the success of entrepreneurial ventures: evidence from the small business innovation research program," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 404-415, August.
    19. David B. Audretsch & Dennis P. Leyden & Albert N. Link, 2013. "Regional Appropriation of University-Based Knowledge and Technology for Economic Development," Economic Development Quarterly, , vol. 27(1), pages 56-61, February.
    20. Hayter, Christopher S., 2016. "Constraining entrepreneurial development: A knowledge-based view of social networks among academic entrepreneurs," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 475-490.
    21. Markus A. Kirchberger & Larissa Pohl, 2016. "Technology commercialization: a literature review of success factors and antecedents across different contexts," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 41(5), pages 1077-1112, October.
    22. Link, Albert & Scott, John, 2017. "Toward an Assessment of the U.S. Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program at the National Institutes of Health," UNCG Economics Working Papers 17-6, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.
    23. Michael Hall & Albert Link, 2015. "Technology-based state growth policies: the case of North Carolina’s Green Business Fund," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 54(2), pages 437-449, March.
    24. Link, Al & Wessner, Charles, 2010. "Universities as Research Partners: Entrepreneurial Explorations and Exploitations," UNCG Economics Working Papers 10-12, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy

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