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How does initial public financing influence private incentives for follow-on investment in early-stage technologies?

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  • Andrew Toole

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  • Calum Turvey

    ()

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Andrew Toole & Calum Turvey, 2009. "How does initial public financing influence private incentives for follow-on investment in early-stage technologies?," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 43-58, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:34:y:2009:i:1:p:43-58 DOI: 10.1007/s10961-007-9074-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Wesley David Sine & Scott Shane & Dante Di Gregorio, 2003. "The Halo Effect and Technology Licensing: The Influence of Institutional Prestige on the Licensing of University Inventions," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 49(4), pages 478-496, April.
    2. Andrew Toole & Dirk Czarnitzki, 2007. "Biomedical Academic Entrepreneurship through the SBIR Program," NBER Chapters,in: Academic Science and Entrepreneurship: Dual Engines of Growth National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. David B. Audretsch & Albert N. Link & John T. Scott, 2013. "Public/private technology partnerships: evaluating SBIR-supported research," Chapters,in: Public Support of Innovation in Entrepreneurial Firms, chapter 5, pages 91-104 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Feldman, Maryann P & Kelley, Maryellen R, 2003. "Leveraging Research and Development: Assessing the Impact of the U.S. Advanced Technology Program," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 153-165, March.
    5. Pindyck, Robert S, 1991. "Irreversibility, Uncertainty, and Investment," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 1110-1148, September.
    6. Lerner, Josh, 1999. "The Government as Venture Capitalist: The Long-Run Impact of the SBIR Program," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 72(3), pages 285-318, July.
    7. Archibald, Robert B. & Finifter, David H., 2003. "Evaluating the NASA small business innovation research program: preliminary evidence of a trade-off between commercialization and basic research," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 605-619, April.
    8. Avinash Dixit, 1992. "Investment and Hysteresis," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(1), pages 107-132, Winter.
    9. David H. Hsu, 2006. "Venture Capitalists and Cooperative Start-up Commercialization Strategy," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 52(2), pages 204-219, February.
    10. Steven N. Kaplan & Per Stromberg, 2001. "Venture Capitalists As Principals: Contracting, Screening, and Monitoring," NBER Working Papers 8202, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Richard R. Nelson, 1959. "The Simple Economics of Basic Scientific Research," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 67, pages 297-297.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:kap:jtecht:v:42:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s10961-016-9476-5 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Douglas Cumming & Sofia Johan, 2016. "Venture’s economic impact in Australia," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 41(1), pages 25-59, February.
    3. Haifeng Qian & Kingsley Haynes, 2014. "Beyond innovation: the Small Business Innovation Research program as entrepreneurship policy," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 39(4), pages 524-543, August.
    4. repec:eee:respol:v:46:y:2017:i:6:p:1142-1161 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    SBIR program; Venture captial; Real options; Technology transfer; Start-ups; Early-stage technology; G38; O31; H25; L26;

    JEL classification:

    • G38 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • H25 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Business Taxes and Subsidies
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship

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