IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/inm/ormnsc/v49y2003i4p478-496.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Halo Effect and Technology Licensing: The Influence of Institutional Prestige on the Licensing of University Inventions

Author

Listed:
  • Wesley David Sine

    () (Robert H. Smith School of Business, University of Maryland, 3314 Van Munching Hall, College Park, Maryland 20742)

  • Scott Shane

    () (Robert H. Smith School of Business, University of Maryland, 3321 Van Munching Hall, College Park, Maryland 20742)

  • Dante Di Gregorio

    () (Robert H. Smith School of Business, University of Maryland, 3321 Van Munching Hall, College Park, Maryland, and Anderson School of Management, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131)

Abstract

Sociologists and organizational theorists have long claimed that the processes of knowledge creation and distribution are fundamentally social. Following in this tradition, we explore the effect of institutional prestige on university technology licensing. Empirically, we examine the influence of university prestige on the annual rate of technology licensing by 102 universities from 1991--1998. We show that institutional prestige increases a university's licensing rate over and above the rate that is explained by the university's past licensing performance. Because licensing success positively impacts future invention production, we argue that institutional prestige leads to stratification in the creation and distribution of university-generated knowledge.

Suggested Citation

  • Wesley David Sine & Scott Shane & Dante Di Gregorio, 2003. "The Halo Effect and Technology Licensing: The Influence of Institutional Prestige on the Licensing of University Inventions," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 49(4), pages 478-496, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:inm:ormnsc:v:49:y:2003:i:4:p:478-496
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.49.4.478.14416
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mowery, David C. & Nelson, Richard R. & Sampat, Bhaven N. & Ziedonis, Arvids A., 2001. "The growth of patenting and licensing by U.S. universities: an assessment of the effects of the Bayh-Dole act of 1980," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 99-119, January.
    2. Mansfield, Edwin, 1998. "Academic research and industrial innovation: An update of empirical findings1," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(7-8), pages 773-776, April.
    3. Etzkowitz, Henry, 1998. "The norms of entrepreneurial science: cognitive effects of the new university-industry linkages," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(8), pages 823-833, December.
    4. Rebecca Henderson & Adam B. Jaffe & Manuel Trajtenberg, 1998. "Universities As A Source Of Commercial Technology: A Detailed Analysis Of University Patenting, 1965-1988," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(1), pages 119-127, February.
    5. Jaffe, Adam B, 1989. "Real Effects of Academic Research," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(5), pages 957-970, December.
    6. Rosenberg, Nathan & Nelson, Richard R., 1994. "American universities and technical advance in industry," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 323-348, May.
    7. Franklin Allen, 1984. "Reputation and Product Quality," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 15(3), pages 311-327, Autumn.
    8. Adams, James D, 1990. "Fundamental Stocks of Knowledge and Productivity Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(4), pages 673-702, August.
    9. Bray, Michael J. & Lee, James N., 2000. "University revenues from technology transfer: Licensing fees vs. equity positions," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 15(5-6), pages 385-392.
    10. Maryann Feldman & Irwin Feller & Janet Bercovitz & Richard Burton, 2002. "Equity and the Technology Transfer Strategies of American Research Universities," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 48(1), pages 105-121, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Prestige; Status; Licensing; Technology;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:inm:ormnsc:v:49:y:2003:i:4:p:478-496. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mirko Janc). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/inforea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.