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Diabetes and the Rise of the SES Health Gradient

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  • James Smith

Abstract

This paper investigates the salient diabetes prevalence patterns across key SES indicators, and how they changed over time. The investigation spans both the conventional concept of diagnosed diabetes and a more comprehensive measure including those whose diabetes is undiagnosed. By doing so, I separate the distinct impact of covariates on disease onset, better self-management, and the probability of disease diagnosis. Emphasis is given to SES correlates of undiagnosed diabetes and how these changed as those with undiagnosed diabetes plummeted over the last 25 years. I estimate the differential ability by education to successful self-manage diabetes, especially when disease self-management became more complicated.

Suggested Citation

  • James Smith, 2007. "Diabetes and the Rise of the SES Health Gradient," NBER Working Papers 12905, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:12905
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Arie Kapteyn & James P. Smith & Arthur van Soest, 2007. "Vignettes and Self-Reports of Work Disability in the United States and the Netherlands," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(1), pages 461-473, March.
    2. Darius Lakdawalla & Tomas Philipson, 2002. "The Growth of Obesity and Technological Change: A Theoretical and Empirical Examination," Working Papers 0203, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago.
    3. Dana P. Goldman & James P. Smith, 2004. "Can Patient Self-Management Help Explain the SES Health Gradient?," HEW 0403004, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Arie Kapteyn & James P. Smith & Arthur Van Soest, 2004. "Self-reported Work Disability in the US and The Netherlands," Working Papers WR-206, RAND Corporation.
    5. Inas Rashad & Michael Grossman & Shin-Yi Chou, 2006. "The Super Size of America: An Economic Estimation of Body Mass Index and Obesity in Adults," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 32(1), pages 133-148, Winter.
    6. James Smith, 2004. "Unravelling the SES health connection," IFS Working Papers W04/02, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sansani, Shahar, 2011. "The effects of school quality on long-term health," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1320-1333.
    2. Lei, Xiaoyan & Yin, Nina & Zhao, Yaohui, 2012. "Socioeconomic status and chronic diseases: The case of hypertension in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 105-121.
    3. Lei, Xiaoyan & Yin, Nina & Zhao, Yaohui, 2010. "SES Health Gradients during the Epidemiological Transition: The Case of China," IZA Discussion Papers 4914, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Xiaoyan Lei & Nina Yin & Yaohui Zhao, 2010. "SES Health Gradients during the Epidemiological Transition : The Case of China," Development Economics Working Papers 22719, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    5. Cutler, David M. & Lange, Fabian & Meara, Ellen & Richards-Shubik, Seth & Ruhm, Christopher J., 2011. "Rising educational gradients in mortality: The role of behavioral risk factors," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1174-1187.
    6. Hanna Grol-Prokopczyk, 2018. "In Pursuit of Anchoring Vignettes That Work: Evaluating Generality Versus Specificity in Vignette Texts," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 73(1), pages 54-63.
    7. Capatina, Elena, 2015. "Life-cycle effects of health risk," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 67-88.
    8. James J. Heckman, 2008. "Schools, Skills, And Synapses," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 46(3), pages 289-324, July.
    9. David M. Cutler & Fabian Lange & Ellen Meara & Seth Richards & Christopher J. Ruhm, 2010. "Explaining the Rise in Educational Gradients in Mortality," NBER Working Papers 15678, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. James J. Heckman, 2007. "The Economics, Technology and Neuroscience of Human Capability Formation," NBER Working Papers 13195, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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    JEL classification:

    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health

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