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Diabetes and the Rise of the SES Health Gradient

  • James Smith

This paper investigates the salient diabetes prevalence patterns across key SES indicators, and how they changed over time. The investigation spans both the conventional concept of diagnosed diabetes and a more comprehensive measure including those whose diabetes is undiagnosed. By doing so, I separate the distinct impact of covariates on disease onset, better self-management, and the probability of disease diagnosis. Emphasis is given to SES correlates of undiagnosed diabetes and how these changed as those with undiagnosed diabetes plummeted over the last 25 years. I estimate the differential ability by education to successful self-manage diabetes, especially when disease self-management became more complicated.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w12905.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 12905.

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Date of creation: Feb 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:12905
Note: AG HC HE
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  1. Arie Kapteyn & James P. Smith & Arthur van Soest, 2005. "Self-reported Work Disability in the US and The Netherlands," Labor and Demography 0504006, EconWPA.
  2. Kapteyn, A. & Smith, J.P. & van Soest, A.H.O., 2007. "Vignettes and self-reports of work disability in the United States and the Netherlands," Other publications TiSEM 17902a1e-7cbb-4f3f-a772-e, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
  3. Darius Lakdawalla & Tomas Philipson, 2002. "The Growth of Obesity and Technological Change: A Theoretical and Empirical Examination," Working Papers 0203, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago.
  4. Inas Rashad & Michael Grossman & Shin-Yi Chou, 2005. "The Super Size of America: An Economic Estimation of Body Mass Index and Obesity in Adults," NBER Working Papers 11584, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. James P. Smith, 2005. "Unraveling the SES-Health Connection," Labor and Demography 0505018, EconWPA.
  6. Dana P. Goldman & James P. Smith, 2004. "Can Patient Self-Management Help Explain the SES Health Gradient?," HEW 0403004, EconWPA.
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