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On asymmetric effects in a monetary policy rule. The case of Poland

Author

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  • Anna Sznajderska

    (National Bank of Poland)

Abstract

Asymmetric effects in a monetary policy rule could appear due to asymmetric preferences of the central bank or/and due to nonlinearities in the economic system. It might be suspected that monetary authorities are more aggressive to the inflation rate when it is above its target level than when it is below. It also seems probable that monetary authorities have different preferences and react more strongly when the level of economic activity is low than when it is high. In this paper we investigate whether the reaction function of the National Bank of Poland (NBP) is asymmetric according to the level of inflation gap and the level of output gap. Moreover, we test whether these asymmetries might possibly stem from the nonlinearities in the Phillips curve. Threshold models are applied and two cases of unknown and known threshold value are investigated.

Suggested Citation

  • Anna Sznajderska, 2012. "On asymmetric effects in a monetary policy rule. The case of Poland," NBP Working Papers 125, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbp:nbpmis:125
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    File URL: http://www.nbp.pl/publikacje/materialy_i_studia/125_en.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Vašíček, Bořek, 2012. "Is monetary policy in the new EU member states asymmetric?," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 235-263.
    2. Paolo Surico, 2003. "Asymmetric Reaction Functions for the Euro Area," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(1), pages 44-57.
    3. Anna Sznajderska, 2012. "On the empirical evidence of asymmetry effects in the interest rate pass-through in Poland," NBP Working Papers 114, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:udc:esteco:v:44:y:2017:i:2:p:97-124 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Esther Barros-Campello & Carlos Pateiro-Rodríguez & J. Venancio Salcines-Cristal & Carlos Pateiro-López, 2017. "El esquema de objetivos de inflación: Evidencia para América Latina (1999-2015)," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 44(2 Year 20), pages 223-250, December.
    3. Jean-Louis Combes & Pierre Lesuisse, 2021. "Inflation and Unemployment, new insights during the EMU accession," Working Papers hal-03216478, HAL.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    nonlinear Taylor rule; nonlinear Phillips curve; asymmetries; threshold models;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • E30 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)

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