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Endogenous Monetary Policy Regime Change

Author

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  • Troy Davig

    () (Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City)

  • Eric M. Leeper

    () (Indiana University Bloomington)

Abstract

This paper makes changes in monetary policy rules (or regimes) endogenous. Changes are triggered when certain endogenous variables cross specified thresholds. Rational expectations equilibria are examined in three models of threshold switching to illustrate that (i) expectations formation effects generated by the possibility of regime change can be quantitatively important; (ii) symmetric shocks can have asymmetric effects; (iii) endogenous switching is a natural way to formally model preemptive policy actions. In a conventional calibrated model, preemptive policy shifts agents’ expectations, enhancing the ability of policy to offset demand shocks; this yields a quantitatively significant “preemption dividend.”

Suggested Citation

  • Troy Davig & Eric M. Leeper, 2006. "Endogenous Monetary Policy Regime Change," Caepr Working Papers 2006-002, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Economics Department, Indiana University Bloomington.
  • Handle: RePEc:inu:caeprp:2006002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Troy Davig & Eric M. Leeper, 2010. "Generalizing the Taylor Principle: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 618-624, March.
    2. Fabián Gredig, 2007. "Asymmetric Monetary Policy Rules and the Achievement of the Inflation Target: The Case of Chile," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 451, Central Bank of Chile.
    3. Canova, Fabio & Ferroni, Filippo & Matthes, Christian, 2015. "Approximating Time Varying Structural Models With Time Invariant Structures," Working Paper 15-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
    4. Mavromatis, Konstantinos, 2012. "Markov Switching Monetary Policy in a two-country DSGE Model," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 982, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    5. Eric M. Leeper & Todd B. Walker, 2011. "Fiscal Limits in Advanced Economies," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 30(1), pages 33-47, March.
    6. Troy A. Davig & Eric M. Leeper, 2009. "Reply to "Generalizing the Taylor principle": a comment," Research Working Paper RWP 09-09, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    7. Gilles Dufrénot & Anwar Khayat, 2014. "Monetary Policy Switching in the Euro Area and Multiple Equilibria: An Empirical Investigation," Working Papers halshs-00973504, HAL.
    8. Andrew P. Blake & Tatiana Kirsanova, 2012. "Discretionary Policy and Multiple Equilibria in LQ RE Models," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(4), pages 1309-1339.
    9. Jesús Fernández-Villaverde & Juan F. Rubio-Ramírez, 2008. "How Structural Are Structural Parameters?," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2007, Volume 22, pages 83-137 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Ravn, Søren Hove, 2014. "Asymmetric monetary policy towards the stock market: A DSGE approach," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 39(PA), pages 24-41.
    11. Barthélemy, Jean & Marx, Magali, 2017. "Solving endogenous regime switching models," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 1-25.
    12. Andrew T. Foerster, 2016. "Monetary Policy Regime Switches And Macroeconomic Dynamics," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 57, pages 211-230, February.
    13. Thanassis Kazanas & Apostolis Philippopoulos & Elias Tzavalis, 2011. "Monetary Policy Rules And Business Cycle Conditions," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 79(s2), pages 73-97, September.
    14. repec:eee:dyncon:v:89:y:2018:i:c:p:26-46 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Ji, Yangyang & Xiao, Wei, 2016. "Government spending multipliers and the zero lower bound," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 87-100.
    16. Eric M. Leeper, 2009. "Anchors Away: How Fiscal Policy Can Undermine the Taylor Principle," NBER Working Papers 15514, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Troy Davig & Eric M. Leeper, 2007. "Generalizing the Taylor Principle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(3), pages 607-635, June.
    18. Fernando Alexandre & Pedro Bação & John Driffill, 2007. "Optimal monetary policy with a regime-switching exchange rate in a forward-looking model," GEMF Working Papers 2007-09, GEMF, Faculty of Economics, University of Coimbra.
    19. Gonzalez-Astudillo, Manuel, 2011. "Policy Rule Coefficients Driven by Latent Factors: Monetary and Fiscal Policy Interactions in an Endowment Economy," MPRA Paper 29976, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. Yanbin Chen & Zhen Huo, 2009. "A Conjecture of Chinese Monetary Policy Rule: Evidence from Survey Data, Markov Regime Switching, and Drifting Coefficients," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 10(1), pages 111-153, May.
    21. Eric M. Leeper, 2009. "Anchors Away: How Fiscal Policy Can Undermine “Good” Monetary Policy," Caepr Working Papers 2009-021, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Economics Department, Indiana University Bloomington.
    22. Thanassis Kazanas & Elias Tzavalis, 2011. "Unveiling the monetary policy rule in euro area," Working Papers 130, Bank of Greece.
    23. Eric M. Leeper, 2011. "Anchors Aweigh: How Fiscal Policy Can Undermine “Good” Monetary Policy," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series,in: Luis Felipe Céspedes & Roberto Chang & Diego Saravia (ed.), Monetary Policy under Financial Turbulence, edition 1, volume 16, chapter 11, pages 411-453 Central Bank of Chile.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Markov switching; Taylor rule; expectations formation;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies

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