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Methodological issues of an impact evaluation of development support in agriculture

Author

Listed:
  • Romain Houssa

    () (CRED, University of Namur)

  • Paul Reding

    () (CRED, University of Namur)

  • Albena Sotirova

    () (CRED, University of Namur)

Abstract

We attempted to investigate the impacts on enterprise performance of two agricultural subsidy projects carried out by the BTC-Benin in 2008-2015. During the working process we encountered several problems. First, the data on the activities of entrepreneurs is incomplete and of poor quality. Second, there are various methodological problems related to the design of the projects that do not allow a clear identification of control and treatment groups for the projects. As a result, we cannot infer any observed difference in performance of entrepreneurs to the project. We were therefore not able to assess the impact of these past projects. Instead, we successfully launched a collaboration with BTC-Benin to design a randomized impact evaluation on a new project that started in January 2016. In order to facilitate the design of the evaluation on the new project this paper concentrates on two issues. First, we present a background on the agricultural crops supported by BTC-Benin as well as some stylized facts about access to external finance in Benin. Second, we analyze the selection process of beneficiaries for the projects by BTC-Benin in 2008-2015. Subsequently, in a companion paper we estimate the determinants of land productivity.

Suggested Citation

  • Romain Houssa & Paul Reding & Albena Sotirova, 2017. "Methodological issues of an impact evaluation of development support in agriculture," BeFinD Working Papers 0120, University of Namur, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:nam:befdwp:0120
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    File URL: http://www.befind.be/Documents/WPs/wp20
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agriculture; Benin; External financing; MSMEs;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q14 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Finance
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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