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The Geographical Mobility of Maori in New Zealand

Author

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  • Isabelle Sin

    () (Motu Economic and Public Policy Research)

  • Steven Stillman

    () (Motu Economic and Public Policy Research)

Abstract

This paper describes the geographical location and internal mobility of the Maori ethnic group in New Zealand between 1991 and 2001. It is often suggested that Maori are less mobile than other ethnic groups because of attachment to particular geographical locations. We compare the mobility of Maori in particular locations to the mobility of similar Europeans in those same locations and find that, contrary to this anecdotal evidence, most Maori are, on average, more mobile than Europeans in New Zealand. We do find that the roughly forty percent of Maori who live in areas local to their iwi (tribe) are less mobile than comparable Europeans in those same areas. Defining local areas both based on both traditional iwi locations and current iwi populations, we find suggestive evidence that social ties are more important than land-based attachment in explaining why these Maori are relatively less mobile, but that land-based attachment is also an important impediment to mobility.

Suggested Citation

  • Isabelle Sin & Steven Stillman, 2005. "The Geographical Mobility of Maori in New Zealand," Working Papers 05_05, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:mtu:wpaper:05_05
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    File URL: http://motu-www.motu.org.nz/wpapers/05_05.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carrington, William J & Detragiache, Enrica & Vishwanath, Tara, 1996. "Migration with Endogenous Moving Costs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 909-930, September.
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    3. David C Maré & Wai Kin Choy, 2001. "Regional Labour Market Adjustment and the Movements of People: A Review," Treasury Working Paper Series 01/08, New Zealand Treasury.
    4. Suzi Kerr & Dave Maré & William Power & Jason Timmins, 2001. "Internal Mobility in New Zealand," Treasury Working Paper Series 01/04, New Zealand Treasury.
    5. Greenwood, Michael J, 1975. "Research on Internal Migration in the United States: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 397-433, June.
    6. Renkow, Mitch & Scrimgeour, Frank G., 2005. "Maori/Non-Maori Income Gaps: Do Differences in Worker Mobility Play a Role?," 2005 Annual meeting, July 24-27, Providence, RI 19214, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    7. Papps, Kerry L. & Newell, James O., 2002. "Identifying Functional Labour Market Areas in New Zealand: A Reconnaissance Study Using Travel-to-Work Data," IZA Discussion Papers 443, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Michelle Poland & David C Maré, 2005. "Defining Geographic Communities," Urban/Regional 0509016, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Mobility; Migration; Social Networks; New Zealand; Maori; Labour Market Areas;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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