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The effects of technological innovations on employment : a new explanation

This paper investigates principally the effects of a technological innovation on hours worked in a sticky price model. Our challenge is to reproduce the short-run decline in employment supported by a large range of recent works, inspired by Gali (1999), regardless of any monetary policy consideration. The model simulations concern the post war U.S. economy under two different monetary policies : an exogenous rule targeting money supply and a simple Taylor rule. The most interesting result is that the introduction of an input-output production structure counterbalances the full-accommodation of a technological innovation when monetary policy is governed by a Taylor rule, by (i) providing the model with more price rigidities ; (ii) inducing a substitution effect between intermediate goods and labor input for plausible values of intermediate inputs share.

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Paper provided by Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1) in its series Cahiers de la Maison des Sciences Economiques with number v05013.

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Length: 44 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mse:wpsorb:v05013
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  1. BOUAKEZ, Hafedh & CARDIA, Emanuela & RUGE-MURCIA, Francisco J., 2002. "Habit Formation and the Persistence of Monetary Shocks," Cahiers de recherche 2002-08, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
  2. Jordi Galí & David López-Salido & Javier Vallés, 2000. "Technology Shocks and Monetary policy: Assessing the Fed's Performance," Banco de Espa�a Working Papers 0013, Banco de Espa�a.
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  4. repec:tpr:qjecon:v:115:y:2000:i:1:p:147-180 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Joseph Atta-Mensah & Ali Dib, 2003. "Bank Lending, Credit Shocks, and the Transmission of Canadian Monetary Policy," Staff Working Papers 03-9, Bank of Canada.
  6. Susanto Basu, 1998. "Technology and business cycles; how well do standard models explain the facts?," Conference Series ; [Proceedings], Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, vol. 42(Jun), pages 207-269.
  7. Olivier Jean Blanchard & Danny Quah, 1988. "The Dynamic Effects of Aggregate Demand and Supply Disturbances," NBER Working Papers 2737, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Michael Dotsey, 1999. "Structure from shocks," Working Paper 99-06, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
  9. Blanchard, Olivier Jean & Kahn, Charles M, 1980. "The Solution of Linear Difference Models under Rational Expectations," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(5), pages 1305-11, July.
  10. Hairault, Jean-Olivier & Portier, Franck, 1993. "Money, New-Keynesian macroeconomics and the business cycle," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 1533-1568, December.
  11. Steve Ambler & Ali Dib & Nooman Rebei, 2003. "Nominal Rigidities and Exchange Rate Pass-Through in a Structural Model of a Small Open Economy," Staff Working Papers 03-29, Bank of Canada.
  12. John B. Taylor, 1998. "An Historical Analysis of Monetary Policy Rules," NBER Working Papers 6768, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Susanto Basu, 1994. "Intermediate Goods and Business Cycles: Implications for Productivity and Welfare," NBER Working Papers 4817, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Carlsson, Mikael, 2000. "Measures of Technology and the Short-Run Responses to Technology Shocks - Is the RBC-Model Consistent with Swedish Manufacturing Data?," Working Paper Series 2000:20, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  15. Robert G. King & Alexander L. Wolman, 1996. "Inflation targeting in a St. Louis model of the 21st century," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 83-107.
  16. Kevin X. D. Huang & Zheng Liu & Louis Phaneuf, 2000. "On the Transmission of Monetary Policy Shocks," Cahiers de recherche CREFE / CREFE Working Papers 112, CREFE, Université du Québec à Montréal, revised Sep 2001.
  17. Taylor, John B., 1993. "Discretion versus policy rules in practice," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 195-214, December.
  18. Ali Dib & Louis Phaneuf, 2001. "An Econometric U.S. Business Cycle Model with Nominal and Real Rigidities," Cahiers de recherche CREFE / CREFE Working Papers 137, CREFE, Université du Québec à Montréal.
  19. Julio J. Rotemberg, 1994. "Prices, Output and Hours: An Empirical Analysis Based on a Sticky Price Model," NBER Working Papers 4948, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  20. Richard Clarida & Jordi Gali & Mark Gertler, 1998. "Monetary Policy Rules and Macroeconomic Stability: Evidence and Some Theory," NBER Working Papers 6442, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  21. Ireland, Peter N., 1997. "A small, structural, quarterly model for monetary policy evaluation," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 83-108, December.
  22. John Shea, 1999. "What Do Technology Shocks Do?," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1998, volume 13, pages 275-322 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  23. Calvo, Guillermo A., 1983. "Staggered prices in a utility-maximizing framework," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 383-398, September.
  24. Yun, Tack, 1996. "Nominal price rigidity, money supply endogeneity, and business cycles," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 345-370, April.
  25. Michael Dotsey, 1999. "The importance of systematic monetary policy for economic activity," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Sum, pages 41-60.
  26. Neville Francis & Valerie A. Ramey, 2002. "Is the Technology-Driven Real Business Cycle Hypothesis Dead?," NBER Working Papers 8726, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  27. Jermann, Urban J., 1998. "Asset pricing in production economies," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 257-275, April.
  28. Marchetti, Domenico J. & Nucci, Francesco, 2005. "Price stickiness and the contractionary effect of technology shocks," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(5), pages 1137-1163, July.
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