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Structure from shocks

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  • Michael Dotsey

Abstract

Arguments in favor of Keynesian models as opposed to real business cycle models are often made on the grounds that the correlations and impulse response patterns found in the latter are inconsistent with the data. A recent and prominent example of this reasoning is Gali (1999). But certain conclusions involve a certain joint hypothesis that implicitly assumes a certain characterization of monetary policy. This paper shows just how crucial the systematic portion of monetary policy is for interpreting many of the correlations and impulse response functions emphasized in the literature. Basically, the featured empirical facts are not useful for discerning the underlying price setting behavior of firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Dotsey, 1999. "Structure from shocks," Working Paper 99-06, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedrwp:99-06
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marchetti, Domenico J. & Nucci, Francesco, 2005. "Price stickiness and the contractionary effect of technology shocks," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(5), pages 1137-1163, July.
    2. Jordi Galí & J. David López-Salido & Javier Vallés, 2007. "Understanding the Effects of Government Spending on Consumption," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 5(1), pages 227-270, March.
    3. Chahnez Boudaya, 2005. "The effects of technological innovations on employment : a new explanation," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00193600, HAL.
    4. Domenico J. Marchetti & Francesco Nucci, 2007. "Pricing Behavior and the Response of Hours to Productivity Shocks," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(7), pages 1587-1611, October.
    5. Jordi Galí & J. David López Salido & Javier Vallés, 2003. "Rule-of-thumb consumers and the design of interest rate rules," Working Papers 0320, Banco de España;Working Papers Homepage.
    6. Buffie, Edward F., 2014. "The Taylor principle fights back, Part II," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 30-49.
    7. Wolman, Alexander L, 2005. "Real Implications of the Zero Bound on Nominal Interest Rates," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 37(2), pages 273-296, April.
    8. Gali, Jordi & Lopez-Salido, J. David & Valles, Javier, 2003. "Technology shocks and monetary policy: assessing the Fed's performance," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(4), pages 723-743, May.
    9. Fabrice Collard & Harris Dellas, 2007. "Technology Shocks and Employment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(523), pages 1436-1459, October.
    10. Liu, Zheng & Phaneuf, Louis, 2007. "Technology shocks and labor market dynamics: Some evidence and theory," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(8), pages 2534-2553, November.
    11. Zheng Liu & Louis Phaneuf, 2004. "What Explains the Effects of Technology Shocks on Labor Market Dynamics?," Emory Economics 0414, Department of Economics, Emory University (Atlanta).
    12. Galí, Jordi, 2002. "New Perspectives on Monetary Policy, Inflation and the Business Cycle," CEPR Discussion Papers 3210, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    13. Yongsung Chang & Jay H. Hong, 2003. "On the Employment Effect of Technology: Evidence from US Manufacturing for 1958-1996," PIER Working Paper Archive 03-004, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.

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