IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/mrd/martwp/2012-01.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Gender Effect in Explaining the Mobility Patterns in the Labor Market: A Case Study from Turkey

Author

Listed:
  • Deger Eryar

    (Izmir University of Economics)

  • Hasan Tekguc

    (Mardin Artuklu Univeristy)

Abstract

This paper examines the importance of gender on different job mobility patterns using an extensive household survey data from İzmir, third largest city in Turkey. The determinants of job-to-job and job-to-non-employment transitions are analyzed with the help of a multinomial logit estimation method. The results indicate that there is a distinction regarding the probability of job mobility patterns based on gender. It is more likely for women to be engaged in job-to-non-employment transition, whereas men tend to switch jobs more often. Although gender plays a significant role regarding job mobility patterns, traditionally imposed social constraints associated with childcare and household duties provide us with mixed results considering the behavior of women in the job market. On the other hand, having high-paid and secure jobs decreases the probability of both patterns of job mobility.

Suggested Citation

  • Deger Eryar & Hasan Tekguc, 2012. "Gender Effect in Explaining the Mobility Patterns in the Labor Market: A Case Study from Turkey," Working Papers 2012-01, Mardin Artuklu Univeristy, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mrd:martwp:2012-01
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/deve.12056/abstract
    File Function: abstract
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Tasci, H. Mehmet & Tansel, Aysit, 2005. "Unemployment and Transitions in the Turkish Labor Market: Evidence from Individual Level Data," IZA Discussion Papers 1663, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Theodossiou, I. & Zangelidis, A., 2009. "Should I stay or should I go? The effect of gender, education and unemployment on labour market transitions," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 566-577, October.
    3. Royalty, Anne Beeson, 1998. "Job-to-Job and Job-to-Nonemployment Turnover by Gender and Education Level," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(2), pages 392-443, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    job-mobility; Turkey; gender;

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mrd:martwp:2012-01. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Hasan Tekguc). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/demrdtr.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.