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Impact of Contingent Work on Subsequent Labor Force Participation and Wages of Workers with Psychiatric Disabilities

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  • Judith A. Cook
  • Jane K. Burke-Miller
  • Dennis D. Grey

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  • Judith A. Cook & Jane K. Burke-Miller & Dennis D. Grey, 2015. "Impact of Contingent Work on Subsequent Labor Force Participation and Wages of Workers with Psychiatric Disabilities," Mathematica Policy Research Reports dc9fe635fb3940d6a5740964f, Mathematica Policy Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:mpr:mprres:dc9fe635fb3940d6a5740964fad418f6
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    File URL: https://www.mathematica.org/-/media/publications/pdfs/disability/drc_wp_psychiatric_disabilities.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. David H. Autor & Susan N. Houseman, 2010. "Do Temporary-Help Jobs Improve Labor Market Outcomes for Low-Skilled Workers? Evidence from "Work First"," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 96-128, July.
    2. Alison L. Booth & Marco Francesconi & Jeff Frank, 2002. "Temporary Jobs: Stepping Stones Or Dead Ends?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages 189-213, June.
    3. Jody Schimmel & David C. Stapleton & Jae Song, "undated". "How Common is "Parking" Among Social Security Disability Insurance Beneficiaries? Evidence from the 1999 Change in the Earnings Level of Substantial Gainful Activity," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 30507ff0bc3a4fc6abbb01646, Mathematica Policy Research.
    4. Julia Lane & Kelly S. Mikelson & Pat Sharkey & Doug Wissoker, 2003. "Pathways to work for low-income workers: The effect of work in the temporary help industry," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(4), pages 581-598.
    5. Michael D. S. Morris & Alexander Vekker, 2001. "An Alternative Look at Temporary Workers, Their Choices, and the Growth in Temporary Employment," Journal of Labor Research, Transaction Publishers, vol. 22(2), pages 373-390, April.
    6. Carolyn J. Heinrich & Peter R. Mueser & Kenneth R. Troske, 2005. "Welfare to Temporary Work: Implications for Labor Market Outcomes," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 87(1), pages 154-173, February.
    7. Susan Averett & Richard Warner & Jani Little & Peter Huxley, 1999. "Labor Supply, Disability Benefits and Mental Illness," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 25(3), pages 279-288, Summer.
    8. Carolyn J. Heinrich & Peter R. Mueser & Kenneth R. Troske, 2009. "The Role of Temporary Help Employment in Low-Wage Worker Advancement," NBER Chapters, in: Studies of Labor Market Intermediation, pages 399-436, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Susan N. Houseman & Anne E. Polivka, 2000. "The Implications of Flexible Staffing Arrangements for Job Stability," Book chapters authored by Upjohn Institute researchers, in: David Neumark (ed.),On the Job: Is Long-Term Employment a Thing of the Past?, pages 427-462, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
    10. repec:mpr:mprres:7173 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Keywords

    Labor Force; Wages; Psychiatric Disabilities;
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