IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Illuminate the unknown: Evaluation of imputation procedures based on the SAVE Survey

  • Ziegelmeyer, Michael


    (Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA))

Questions about monetary variables (such as income, wealth or savings) are key components of questionnaires on household finances. However, missing information on such sensitive topics is a well-known phenomenon which can seriously bias any inference based only on complete cases analysis. Many imputation techniques have been developed and implemented in several surveys. Using the German SAVE data, this paper evaluates different techniques for the imputation of monetary variables implementing a simulation study, where a random pattern of missingness is imposed on the observed values of the variables of interest. New estimation techniques are necessary to overcome the upward bias of monetary variables caused by the initially implemented imputation procedure. A Monte-Carlo simulation based on the observed data shows the superiority of the newly implemented smearing estimate to construct the missing data structure. All waves are consistently imputed using the new method.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL:
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy in its series MEA discussion paper series with number 11235.

in new window

Date of creation: 22 Feb 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mea:meawpa:11235
Contact details of provider: Postal: Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy, Amalienstraße 33, 80799 München, Germany
Phone: +49/89/38602.442
Fax: +49/89/38602.490
Web page:

Order Information: Email:

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Frick, Joachim R. & Grabka, Markus M., 2007. "Item Non-Response and Imputation of Annual Labor Income in Panel Surveys from a Cross-National Perspective," IZA Discussion Papers 3043, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Essig, Lothar & Winter, Joachim, 2009. "Item non-response to financial questions in household surveys: An experimental study of interviewer and mode effects," Munich Reprints in Economics 20547, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  3. Patrick Royston, 2004. "Multiple imputation of missing values," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 4(3), pages 227-241, September.
  4. Michael Ziegelmeyer, 2009. "Documentation of the logical imputation using the panel structure of the 2003-2008 German SAVE Survey," MEA discussion paper series 09173, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
  5. Bello, A. L., 1995. "Imputation techniques in regression analysis: Looking closely at their implementation," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 20(1), pages 45-57, July.
  6. Willard G. Manning & John Mullahy, 1999. "Estimating Log Models: To Transform or Not to Transform?," NBER Technical Working Papers 0246, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. John Mullahy, 1998. "Much Ado About Two: Reconsidering Retransformation and the Two-Part Model in Health Economics," NBER Technical Working Papers 0228, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Daniel Schunk, 2007. "A Markov Chain Monte Carlo Multiple Imputation Procedure for Dealing with Item Nonresponse in the German SAVE Survey," MEA discussion paper series 07121, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
  9. Mullahy, John, 1998. "Much ado about two: reconsidering retransformation and the two-part model in health econometrics," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 247-281, June.
  10. Manning, Willard G., 1998. "The logged dependent variable, heteroscedasticity, and the retransformation problem," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 283-295, June.
  11. Wasito, Ito & Mirkin, Boris, 2006. "Nearest neighbours in least-squares data imputation algorithms with different missing patterns," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 50(4), pages 926-949, February.
  12. repec:ese:iserwp:2004-19 is not listed on IDEAS
  13. Daniel Schunk, 2008. "A Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm for multiple imputation in large surveys," AStA Advances in Statistical Analysis, Springer, vol. 92(1), pages 101-114, February.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mea:meawpa:11235. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Henning Frankenberger)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.