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Information, Imitation and Growth

  • K Blackburn
  • N Bose

This paper presents an analysis of the role of information in determining the growth and development prospects of economies. In an overlapping generations model, producers of capital choose between two types of technology - safe and risky. Depending on the information available, decision making may or may not be characterised by herd behaviour whereby each producer imitates the decisions of others in an information cascade. Multiple development regimes arise when the quality of information is determined endogenously through purposeful, but costly, activities. It is shown that both the prospect of transition between these regimes and the characteristics of the transition path can be very different in imitation-free and imitation-prone economies.

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File URL: http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/medialibrary/cgbcr/discussionpapers/dpcgbcr5.pdf
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Paper provided by Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester in its series Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series with number 05.

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Length: 24 pages
Date of creation: 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:man:cgbcrp:05
Contact details of provider: Postal: Manchester M13 9PL
Phone: (0)161 275 4868
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Web page: http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/subjects/economics/our-research/centre-for-growth-and-business-cycle-research/

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  1. Ellison, Glenn & Fudenberg, Drew, 1992. "Rules of Thumb for Social Learning," IDEI Working Papers 17, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
  2. Gul, Faruk & Lundholm, Russell, 1995. "Endogenous Timing and the Clustering of Agents' Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(5), pages 1039-66, October.
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  4. Scharfstein, David. & Stein, Jeremy C., 1988. "Herd behavior and investment," Working papers WP 2062-88., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
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  7. Andreoni, James, 1989. "Giving with Impure Altruism: Applications to Charity and Ricardian Equivalence," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(6), pages 1447-58, December.
  8. Ellison, Glenn & Fudenberg, Drew, 1995. "Word-of-Mouth Communication and Social Learning," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(1), pages 93-125, February.
  9. Katz, Michael L & Shapiro, Carl, 1985. "Network Externalities, Competition, and Compatibility," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(3), pages 424-40, June.
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  12. Welch, Ivo, 1992. " Sequential Sales, Learning, and Cascades," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(2), pages 695-732, June.
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