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Part-Time Work and Industry Growth

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  • Bruce Fallick

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Abstract

The popular impression that employment in the U.S. has become more part-time in recent years may be driven by a tendency for faster-growing industries to use relatively more part-time work. This paper documents this association for the period 1983-1993, and demonstrates that it is robust to questions about how to measure industry growth and part-time intensity. A similar relationship can be discerned in several other countries. However, judging from data from the 1930s on, the association does not emerge clearly in the United States until the 1980s, suggesting that part-time work and industry growth are not intrinsically related. Moreover, both the relative growth rates and the relative part-time intensities of industries have changed markedly over the post-war period. There is no indication that part-time work at fast-growing industries is more likely to be involuntary, although this may be true for entering workers, nor has there been any trend in that direction.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruce Fallick, 1998. "Part-Time Work and Industry Growth," LIS Working papers 176, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
  • Handle: RePEc:lis:liswps:176
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Friesen, Jane, 1997. "The Dynamic Demand for Part-Time and Full-Time Labour," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 64(255), pages 495-507, August.
    2. Fallick, Bruce Chelimsky, 1996. "The hiring of new labor by expanding industries," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(1), pages 25-42, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Barry T. Hirsch, 2005. "Why Do Part-Time Workers Earn Less? The Role of Worker and Job Skills," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 58(4), pages 525-551, July.
    2. Rob Euwals & Maurice Hogerbrugge, 2004. "Explaining the growth of part-time employment; factors of supply and demand," CPB Discussion Paper 31, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    3. William Even & David Macpherson, 2004. "Do Pensions Impede Phased Retirement?," Labor and Demography 0407001, EconWPA.
    4. Euwals, Rob & Hogerbrugge, Maurice, 2006. "Explaining the Growth of Part-Time Employment: Factors of Supply and Demand," CEPR Discussion Papers 5595, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Lopez, TarĂ¡ Burnthorne & Babin, Barry J. & Chung, Christina, 2009. "Perceptions of ethical work climate and person-organization fit among retail employees in Japan and the US: A cross-cultural scale validation," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 62(6), pages 594-600, June.
    6. Euwals, Rob & Hogerbrugge, Maurice, 2004. "Explaining the Growth of Part-Time Employment: Factors of Supply and Demand," IZA Discussion Papers 1124, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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