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The demand of part-time in European companies: a multilevel modelling approach


  • Dominique Anxo
  • Shakir Hussain
  • Ghazi Shukur


Part-time work is one of the most well-known ‘atypical’ working time arrangements. In contrast to previous studies focusing on the supply side, the originality of our research is to investigate the demand-side of part-time work and to examine how and why companies use part-time work. Based on a large and unique sample of European firms operating in 21 member states, we use a multilevel multinomial modelling in a Bayesian environment. Our results suggest that the variations in the extent of part-time workers at the establishment level is determined more by country-specific features than by industry-specific factors.

Suggested Citation

  • Dominique Anxo & Shakir Hussain & Ghazi Shukur, 2012. "The demand of part-time in European companies: a multilevel modelling approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(8), pages 1057-1066, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:44:y:2012:i:8:p:1057-1066
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2010.534075

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Friesen, Jane, 1997. "The Dynamic Demand for Part-Time and Full-Time Labour," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 64(255), pages 495-507, August.
    2. Walter Y. Oi, 1962. "Labor as a Quasi-Fixed Factor," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 70, pages 538-538.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anja Iseke, 2014. "The Part-Time Job Satisfaction Puzzle: Different Types of Job Discrepancies and the Moderating Effect of Family Importance," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 52(3), pages 445-469, September.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J82 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Labor Force Composition


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