IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/lev/wrkpap/wp_802.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Shadow Banking: Policy Challenges for Central Banks

Author

Listed:
  • Thorvald Grung-Moe

Abstract

Central banks responded with exceptional liquidity support during the financial crisis to prevent a systemic meltdown. They broadened their tool kit and extended liquidity support to nonbanks and key financial markets. Many want central banks to embrace this expanded role as "market maker of last resort" going forward. This would provide a liquidity backstop for systemically important markets and the shadow banking system that is deeply integrated with these markets. But how much liquidity support can central banks provide to the shadow banking system without risking their balance sheets? I discuss the expanding role of the shadow banking sector and the key drivers behind its growing importance. There are close parallels between the growth of shadow banking before the recent financial crisis and earlier financial crises, with rapid growth in near monies as a common feature. This ebb and flow of shadow-banking-type liabilities are indeed an ingrained part of our advanced financial system. We need to reflect and consider whether official sector liquidity should be mobilized to stem a future breakdown in private shadow banking markets. Central banks should be especially concerned about providing liquidity support to financial markets without any form of structural reform. It would indeed be ironic if central banks were to declare victory in the fight against too-big-to-fail institutions, just to end up bankrolling too-big-to-fail financial markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Thorvald Grung-Moe, 2014. "Shadow Banking: Policy Challenges for Central Banks," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_802, Levy Economics Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:lev:wrkpap:wp_802
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.levyinstitute.org/pubs/wp_802.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alexi Savov & Alan Moreira, 2014. "The Macroeconomics of Shadow Banking," 2014 Meeting Papers 254, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Adrian, T. & Shin, H S., 2009. "The shadow banking system: implications for fi nancial regulation," Financial Stability Review, Banque de France, issue 13, pages 1-10, September.
    3. Andrew Sheng, 2011. "Central Banking in an Era of Quantitative Easing," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_684, Levy Economics Institute.
    4. Thorvald Grung Moe, 2012. "Shadow Banking and the Limits of Central Bank Liquidity Support: How to Achieve a Better Balance between Global and Official Liquidity," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_712, Levy Economics Institute.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:taf:rripxx:v:24:y:2017:i:5:p:802-838 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Biondi Yuri, 2016. "Empowering Market-Based Finance: A Note on Bank Bailouts in the Aftermath of the North Atlantic Financial Crisis of 2007," Accounting, Economics, and Law: A Convivium, De Gruyter, vol. 6(1), pages 79-84, March.
    3. repec:bpj:aelcon:v:7:y:2017:i:3:p:29:n:2 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:mes:postke:v:37:y:2015:i:4:p:568-589 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial Regulation; Financial Stability; Monetary Policy; Central Bank Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:lev:wrkpap:wp_802. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Elizabeth Dunn). General contact details of provider: http://www.levyinstitute.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.