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Industrial Production in Space: A Comparison of East Asia and Europe

Author

Listed:
  • Kazunobu Hayakawa

    (Inter-Disciplinary Studies Center, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan)

  • Zheng Ji

    (Graduate School of Economics, Keio University, Japan)

  • Ayako Obashi

    (Faculty of Economics, Keio University, Japan)

Abstract

Inspired by the observed contrasting patterns of geographical distribution of the electric machinery industry in East Asia and Europe, this paper conducts an empirical clarification of the difference in spatial relationships in the industry sizes among countries within a region by use of spatial econometric technique. The results indicate that, while the size of the electric machinery industry in a country is positively correlated with that of neighboring countries in East Asia, there is no significant spatial correlation in Europe. Such a difference in spatial interdependence has important implications for economic development in those regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Kazunobu Hayakawa & Zheng Ji & Ayako Obashi, 2010. "Industrial Production in Space: A Comparison of East Asia and Europe," Keio/Kyoto Joint Global COE Discussion Paper Series 2010-022, Keio/Kyoto Joint Global COE Program.
  • Handle: RePEc:kei:dpaper:2010-022
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    File URL: http://ies.keio.ac.jp/old_project/old/gcoe-econbus/pdf/dp/DP2010-022.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kristian Behrens & Cem Ertur & Wilfried Koch, 2012. "‘Dual’ Gravity: Using Spatial Econometrics To Control For Multilateral Resistance," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(5), pages 773-794, August.
    2. Kimura, Fukunari & Takahashi, Yuya & Hayakawa, Kazunobu, 2007. "Fragmentation and parts and components trade: Comparison between East Asia and Europe," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 23-40, February.
    3. Baltagi, Badi H. & Egger, Peter & Pfaffermayr, Michael, 2007. "Estimating models of complex FDI: Are there third-country effects?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 140(1), pages 260-281, September.
    4. Fukunari KIMURA, 2006. "International Production and Distribution Networks in East Asia: Eighteen Facts, Mechanics, and Policy Implications," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 1(2), pages 326-344.
    5. Keith Head & Thierry Mayer, 2000. "Non-Europe: The magnitude and causes of market fragmentation in the EU," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 136(2), pages 284-314, June.
    6. A. Porojan, 2001. "Trade Flows and Spatial Effects: The Gravity Model Revisited," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 265-280, July.
    7. Keith Head & Thierry Mayer, 2004. "Market Potential and the Location of Japanese Investment in the European Union," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(4), pages 959-972, November.
    8. Cletus C. Coughlin & Eran Segev, 2000. "Foreign Direct Investment in China: A Spatial Econometric Study," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(1), pages 1-23, January.
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