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Banks' bail-in and the new banking regulation: an EU event study

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Abstract

The purpose of the study is to estimate the short term reaction of equity and CDS prices of a sample of European banks to various events and announcements, such as bail-ins, recapitalisations, and the proposal and final agreement of the EU reform package of prudential and resolution rules in banking (“banking package†). This study replicates and expand Schafer et al. (2017) to include more recent EU events, such as the resolution of Banco Popular and the further tightening of EU prudential and resolution rules in 2019. Overall, our analysis shows the most recent events did not seem to trigger abnormal reactions in bank funding markets after bank prudential and resolution reforms were implemented in the EU in 2016. An exception is the 2018 Council agreement on its general approach to the proposed banking package. While the 2016 and 2019 reforms of EU prudential and resolution rules seem to have increased perceived probabilities of

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  • Bellia, Mario & Maccaferri, Sara, 2020. "Banks' bail-in and the new banking regulation: an EU event study," Working Papers 2020-07, Joint Research Centre, European Commission (Ispra site).
  • Handle: RePEc:jrs:wpaper:202007
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    1. Schäfer, Alexander & Schnabel, Isabel & Weder di Mauro, Beatrice, 2016. "Bail-in Expectations for European Banks: Actions Speak Louder than Words," CEPR Discussion Papers 11061, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Schäfer, Alexander & Schnabel, Isabel & Weder di Mauro, Beatrice, 2016. "Bail-in Expectations for European Banks: Actions Speak Louder than Words," CEPR Discussion Papers 11061, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Alexander Schäfer & Isabel Schnabel & Beatrice Weder di Mauro, 2016. "Financial Sector Reform after the Subprime Crisis: Has Anything Happened?," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 20(1), pages 77-125.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Too-Big-To-Fail; Bail-in; FSB; event study; Credit Default Swap; CDS;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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