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The "V-Factor": Distribution, Timing and Correlates of the Great Indian Growth Turnaround

Author

Listed:
  • Chetan Ghate

    () (Indian Statistical Institute)

  • Stephen Wright

    (University of London)

Abstract

Following Bai (2004) and Bai and Ng (2004) we estimate a common factor representation of a panel of output series for India, disaggregated by 15 states and 14 broad industry groups. We find that a single common "V-Factor" accounts for a large part of the significant shift in the cross-sectional distribution of state-sectoral output growth rates since the mid -1980s. The time profile of the V-Factor appears to be closely related to trade liberalization.

Suggested Citation

  • Chetan Ghate & Stephen Wright, 2009. "The "V-Factor": Distribution, Timing and Correlates of the Great Indian Growth Turnaround," Jena Economic Research Papers 2009-010, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  • Handle: RePEc:jrp:jrpwrp:2009-010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Philippe Aghion & Robin Burgess & Stephen J. Redding & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2008. "The Unequal Effects of Liberalization: Evidence from Dismantling the License Raj in India," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1397-1412, September.
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    5. Ghate, Chetan & Wright, Stephen, 2012. "The “V-factor”: Distribution, timing and correlates of the great Indian growth turnaround," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 58-67.
    6. Chetan Ghate, 2008. "Understanding divergence in India: a political economy approach," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(1), pages 1-9.
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    18. Chetan Ghate & Stephen Wright, 2011. "Correlates of statewise participation in the great Indian growth turnaround: some preliminary robustness results," Birkbeck Working Papers in Economics and Finance 1104, Birkbeck, Department of Economics, Mathematics & Statistics.
    19. Jushan Bai & Pierre Perron, 2003. "Computation and analysis of multiple structural change models," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(1), pages 1-22.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Girish Bahal & Mehdi Raissi & Volodymyr Tulin, 2018. "Crowding-Out or Crowding-In Public and Private Investment in India," NCAER Working Papers 114, National Council of Applied Economic Research.
    2. Bahal, Girish & Raissi, Mehdi & Tulin, Volodymyr, 2018. "Crowding-out or crowding-in? Public and private investment in India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 323-333.
    3. Castelló-Climent, Amparo & Mukhopadhyay, Abhiroop, 2013. "Mass education or a minority well educated elite in the process of growth: The case of India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 303-320.
    4. Ghate, Chetan & Pandey, Radhika & Patnaik, Ila, 2013. "Has India emerged? Business cycle stylized facts from a transitioning economy," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 157-172.
    5. Kunal Sen & Sabyasachi Kar & Jagadish Prasad Sahu, 2014. "The political economy of economic growth in India, 1993-2013," Global Development Institute Working Paper Series esid-044-14, GDI, The University of Manchester.
    6. Das, Samarjit & Ghate, Chetan & Robertson, Peter E., 2015. "Remoteness, Urbanization, and India’s Unbalanced Growth," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 572-587.
    7. Sabyasachi Kar & Debajit Jha & Alpana Kateja, 2011. "Club-convergence and polarization of states: A nonparametric analysis of post-reform India," Indian Growth and Development Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 4(1), pages 53-72, April.
    8. Chetan Ghate & Stephen Wright, 2011. "Correlates of statewise participation in the great Indian growth turnaround: some preliminary robustness results," Birkbeck Working Papers in Economics and Finance 1104, Birkbeck, Department of Economics, Mathematics & Statistics.
    9. Kan, Kamhon & Wang, Yong, 2013. "Comparing China and India: A factor accumulation perspective," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 879-894.
    10. Banerjee, Rajabrata & Roy, Saikat Sinha, 2014. "Human capital, technological progress and trade: What explains India's long run growth?," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 15-31.
    11. Ghate, Chetan & Wright, Stephen, 2012. "The “V-factor”: Distribution, timing and correlates of the great Indian growth turnaround," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(1), pages 58-67.
    12. Kala Seetharam Sridhar & A. Venugopala Reddy, 2011. "Investment and Economic Opportunities: Urbanization, Infrastructure and Governance in The North and South of India," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 18(1), pages 1-46, June.
    13. Kevin S. Nell, 2013. "A Total Factor Productivity-Capital Accumulation Hypothesis of India’s Growth Transitions," CEF.UP Working Papers 1313, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic Growth; Factor Models; Principal Components; Convergence; Divergence; Indian States;

    JEL classification:

    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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