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Fertility and Economic Instability: The Role of Unemployment and Job Displacement

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  • Emilia Del Bono
  • Andrea Weber
  • Rudolf Winter-Ebmer

Abstract

We study the effect of job displacement on fertility in a sample of white collar women in Austria. Using instrumental variables methods we show that unemploy- ment incidence as such has no negative effect on fertility decisions, but the very fact of being displaced from a career-oriented job has; fertility rates for women affected by a plant closure are signiffcantly below those of a control group, even after six years.

Suggested Citation

  • Emilia Del Bono & Andrea Weber & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2011. "Fertility and Economic Instability: The Role of Unemployment and Job Displacement," Economics working papers 2011-01, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  • Handle: RePEc:jku:econwp:2011_01
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Massimo Cecchini & Sirio Cividino & Rosario Turco & Luca Salvati, 2019. "Population Age Structure, Complex Socio-Demographic Systems and Resilience Potential: A Spatio-Temporal, Evenness-Based Approach," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(7), pages 1-12, April.
    2. Karabchuk, Tatiana, 2018. "Job Stability and Fertility Intentions of Young Adults in Europe: Does Labor Market Legislation Matter?," CEI Working Paper Series 2018-15, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    3. Chiara Comolli & Fabrizio Bernardi, 2015. "The causal effect of the great recession on childlessness of white American women," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-24, December.
    4. repec:zbw:rwirep:0379 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Luca Salvati & Margherita Carlucci & Pere Serra & Ilaria Zambon, 2019. "Demographic Transitions and Socioeconomic Development in Italy, 1862–2009: A Brief Overview," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(1), pages 1-12, January.
    6. Virginia Sanchez Marcos & Ezgi Kaya & Nezih Guner, 2017. "Labor Market Frictions and Lowest Low Fertility," 2017 Meeting Papers 1015, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Rares Halbac-Cotoara-Zamfir & Sirio Cividino & Gianluca Egidi & Rosanna Salvia & Luca Salvati, 2020. "Rapidity of Change in Population Age Structures: A Local Approach Based on Multiway Factor Analysis," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(7), pages 1-13, April.
    8. De Paola, Maria & Nistico, Roberto & Scoppa, Vincenzo, 2020. "Fertility Decisions and Employment Protection: The Unintended Consequences of the Italian Jobs Act," IZA Discussion Papers 12991, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Liepmann, Hannah, 2018. "The impact of a negative labor demand shock on fertility – Evidence from the fall of the Berlin Wall," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 210-224.
    10. Barbara Hofmann & Michaela Kreyenfeld & Arne Uhlendorff, 2017. "Job Displacement and First Birth Over the Business Cycle," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(3), pages 933-959, June.
    11. Yusuf Sofiyandi1, 2018. "The Effect of Residential Location and Housing Unit Characteristics on Labor Force Participation of Childbearing Women in Indonesia: Using Twin Births As A Quasi-Natural Experiment," LPEM FEBUI Working Papers 201822, LPEM, Faculty of Economics and Business, University of Indonesia, revised Jul 2018.
    12. Klemm, Marcus, 2012. "Job Security and Fertility: Evidence from German Reunification," Ruhr Economic Papers 379, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    13. Boberg-Fazlic, Nina & Ivets, Maryna & Karlsson, Martin & Nilsson, Therese, 2017. "Disease and Fertility: Evidence from the 1918 Influenza Pandemic in Sweden," Working Paper Series 1179, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    14. Olukorede Abiona, 2017. "The Impact of Unanticipated Economic Shocks on the Demand for Contraceptives: Evidence from Uganda," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(12), pages 1696-1709, December.
    15. Eliason, Marcus & Hensvik, Lena & Kramarz, Francis & Nordstrom Skans, Oskar, 2019. "Social Connections and the Sorting of Workers to Firms," CEPR Discussion Papers 13672, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    16. Adrián Nieto, 2018. "Permanent employment and fertility: The importance of job security and the career costs of childbearing," Discussion Papers 2018/01, University of Nottingham, Centre for Finance, Credit and Macroeconomics (CFCM).
    17. Wolfgang Auer, 2018. "Empirische Aufsätze zu den sozioökonomischen Konsequenzen von ökonomischer Unsicherheit," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 79, December.
    18. Marcantonio Caltabiano & Chiara Ludovica Comolli & Alessandro Rosina, 2017. "The effect of the Great Recession on permanent childlessness in Italy," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 37(20), pages 635-668.
    19. Marcus Klemm, 2012. "Job Security and Fertility: Evidence from German Reunification," Ruhr Economic Papers 0379, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    20. Luca Salvati, 2018. "Population growth and the economic crisis: understanding latent patterns of change in Greece, 2002–2016," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 105-126, July.
    21. Giammarco Alderotti & Daniele Vignoli & Michela Baccini & Anna Matysiak, 2019. "Employment Uncertainty and Fertility: A Network Meta-Analysis of European Research Findings," Econometrics Working Papers Archive 2019_06, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Statistica, Informatica, Applicazioni "G. Parenti".

    More about this item

    Keywords

    fertility; unemployment; plant closings; human capital;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J65 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment Insurance; Severance Pay; Plant Closings
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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