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Exchange Rate Policies: Fact or Fiction in the Rise of High Performance Asian Economies

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  • Turan Subasat

    () (Department of Economics, Izmir University of Economics)

Abstract

Many economists believe that the nature of exchange rate management was an important reason for rapid economic growth in East Asia. In this view, Asian countries avoided extreme exchange rate appreciations and kept their nominal exchange rates close to market clearing levels. In contrast, the inappropriate exchange rate policies pursued by many Latin American and African countries in the late 1970s and 1980s contributed a great deal towards their poor economic performance. This paper challenges the above views on the type of exchange rate policies adopted by the East Asian, Latin American and African countries. The empirical evidence fails to prove that the exchange rate policies of the East Asian economies were significantly different from those of other developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Turan Subasat, 2008. "Exchange Rate Policies: Fact or Fiction in the Rise of High Performance Asian Economies," Working Papers 0802, Izmir University of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:izm:wpaper:0802
    as

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    File URL: http://eco.ieu.edu.tr/wp-content/wp0802.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sekkat, Khalid & Varoudakis, Aristomene, 2000. "Exchange rate management and manufactured exports in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 237-253, February.
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    6. Sahn, David E. & Dorosh, Paul & Younger, Stephen, 1996. "Exchange rate, fiscal and agricultural policies in Africa: Does adjustment hurt the poor?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 719-747, April.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Exchange rate policy; Trade policy; East Asian Miracle; exports growth; economic growth;

    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • O24 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Trade Policy; Factor Movement; Foreign Exchange Policy

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