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Labor Supply Effects of Winning a Lottery

Author

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  • Picchio, Matteo

    () (Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona)

  • Suetens, Sigrid

    () (Tilburg University)

  • van Ours, Jan C.

    () (Erasmus University Rotterdam)

Abstract

This paper investigates how winning a substantial lottery prize affects labor supply. Analyzing data from Dutch State Lottery winners, we find that earnings are affected but not employment. Lottery prize winners reduce their hours of work but they are not very likely to withdraw from the labor force. We also find that the effects of lottery prizes last for several years and materialize predominantly among young single individuals without children.

Suggested Citation

  • Picchio, Matteo & Suetens, Sigrid & van Ours, Jan C., 2015. "Labor Supply Effects of Winning a Lottery," IZA Discussion Papers 9472, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9472
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jeffrey R. Brown & Courtney C. Coile & Scott J. Weisbenner, 2010. "The Effect of Inheritance Receipt on Retirement," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(2), pages 425-434, May.
    2. David Cesarini & Erik Lindqvist & Robert Östling & Björn Wallace, 2016. "Wealth, Health, and Child Development: Evidence from Administrative Data on Swedish Lottery Players," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 131(2), pages 687-738.
    3. David Joulfaian & Mark O. Wilhelm, 1994. "Inheritance and Labor Supply," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(4), pages 1205-1234.
    4. Michael P. Keane, 2011. "Labor Supply and Taxes: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(4), pages 961-1075, December.
    5. Alison Booth & Jan Ours, 2013. "Part-time jobs: what women want?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(1), pages 263-283, January.
    6. David Cesarini & Erik Lindqvist & Matthew J. Notowidigdo & Robert Östling, 2017. "The Effect of Wealth on Individual and Household Labor Supply: Evidence from Swedish Lotteries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(12), pages 3917-3946, December.
    7. Gardner, Jonathan & Oswald, Andrew J., 2007. "Money and mental wellbeing: A longitudinal study of medium-sized lottery wins," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 49-60, January.
    8. Guido W. Imbens & Donald B. Rubin & Bruce I. Sacerdote, 2001. "Estimating the Effect of Unearned Income on Labor Earnings, Savings, and Consumption: Evidence from a Survey of Lottery Players," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(4), pages 778-794, September.
    9. Peter J. Kuhn & Peter Kooreman & Adriaan R. Soetevent & Arie Kapteyn, 2008. "The Own and Social Effects of an Unexpected Income Shock: Evidence from the Dutch Postcode Lottery," NBER Working Papers 14035, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Brian A. Jacob & Jens Ludwig, 2012. "The Effects of Housing Assistance on Labor Supply: Evidence from a Voucher Lottery," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(1), pages 272-304, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. David Cesarini & Erik Lindqvist & Matthew J. Notowidigdo & Robert Östling, 2017. "The Effect of Wealth on Individual and Household Labor Supply: Evidence from Swedish Lotteries," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(12), pages 3917-3946, December.
    2. Fabian Kindermann & Lukas Mayr & Dominik Sachs, 2018. "Inheritance Taxation and Wealth Effects on the Labor Supply of Heirs," NBER Chapters, in: Trans-Atlantic Public Economics Seminar 2018, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Salehi-Isfahani, Djavad & Mostafavi-Dehzooei, Mohammad H., 2018. "Cash transfers and labor supply: Evidence from a large-scale program in Iran," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 349-367.
    4. Renata Bottazzi & Serena Trucchi & Matthew Wakefield, 2017. "Labour supply responses to financial wealth shocks: evidence from Italy," IFS Working Papers W17/29, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    5. Serena Trucchi & Elsa Fornero & Mariacristina Rossi, 2018. "Retirement rigidities and the gap between effective and desired labour supply by older workers," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 7(1), pages 1-19, December.
    6. Amparo Nagore Garcia & Mariacristina Rossi & Arthur van Soest, 2018. "Labour Market Decisions of the Self-Employed in the Netherlands at the Statutory Retirement Age," Working papers 057, Department of Economics and Statistics (Dipartimento di Scienze Economico-Sociali e Matematico-Statistiche), University of Torino.
    7. Juliana Mesén Vargas, 2018. "Income Effect on Labor Outcomes for People Living in Poverty: the case of PROGRESA," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2018015, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    lottery players; wealth shocks; income effects; labor supply;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J29 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Other

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