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Using Spatial Econometric Techniques to Analyze the Joint Employment Decisions of Spouses


  • Kalenkoski, Charlene M.

    () (Texas Tech University)

  • Lacombe, Donald J.

    () (West Virginia University)


Studies of the joint time-use decisions of spouses have relied on joint estimation of time-use equations, sometimes assuming correlated errors across spouses' equations and sometimes directly examining the effects of one spouse's time use on another's, relying on panel data or instrumental variables techniques to account for endogeneity. However, panel data often are not available and available instruments often are not satisfactory, making examination of the direct relationship between spouses' time use difficult. Spatial econometric techniques applied to cross-sectional data do not require instrumental variables. This study estimates a Spatial Autoregressive (SAR) Model to examine the labor hours of husbands and wives in dual-earner couples using the 2012 Annual Social and Economic Supplement to the Current Population Survey (ASEC). In this model, each spouse is treated as a direct “neighbor” of the other in a spatial weight matrix and non-spouses are treated as non-neighbors. Estimates of both the own- and cross-wage effects on labor hours and an estimate of the direct relationship between spouses' labor hours are obtained.

Suggested Citation

  • Kalenkoski, Charlene M. & Lacombe, Donald J., 2014. "Using Spatial Econometric Techniques to Analyze the Joint Employment Decisions of Spouses," IZA Discussion Papers 8050, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8050

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Michael A. Leeds & Peter von Allmen, 2004. "Spousal Complementarity in Home Production," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(4), pages 795-811, October.
    2. Daniel Hallberg & Anders Klevmarken, 2003. "Time for children: A study of parent's time allocation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(2), pages 205-226, May.
    3. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/9664 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Younghwan Song, 2007. "The working spouse penalty/premium and married women’s labor supply," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 279-304, September.
    5. Laurens Cherchye & Bram De Rock & Frederic Vermeulen, 2012. "Married with Children: A Collective Labor Supply Model with Detailed Time Use and Intrahousehold Expenditure Information," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(7), pages 3377-3405, December.
    6. Hans Bloemen & Elena Stancanelli, 2008. "How Do Parents Allocate Time? The Effects of Wages and Income," Working Papers hal-01066183, HAL.
    7. Lundberg, Shelly J, 1988. "Labor Supply of Husbands and Wives: A Simultaneous Equations Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 70(2), pages 224-235, May.
    8. Rachel Connelly & Jean Kimmel, 2009. "Spousal influences on parents’ non-market time choices," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 361-394, December.
    9. Hans Bloemen & Silvia Pasqua & Elena Stancanelli, 2010. "An empirical analysis of the time allocation of Italian couples: are they responsive?," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 345-369, September.
    10. Hans G. Bloemen & Elena G.F. Stancanelli, 2008. "How do Parents allocate Time ?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 08-079/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    11. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 2007. "Changes in the Labor Supply Behavior of Married Women: 1980–2000," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 393-438.
    12. R. Pace & Shuang Zhu, 2012. "Separable spatial modeling of spillovers and disturbances," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 75-90, January.
    13. J. Barkley Rosser, 2009. "Introduction," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Complexity, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    14. Peter Kennedy, 2003. "A Guide to Econometrics, 5th Edition," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 5, volume 1, number 026261183x, January.
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    1. repec:spr:jlabre:v:38:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s12122-017-9258-3 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item


    employment; intrahousehold allocation of time; own- and cross-wage effects; spatial econometrics;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation

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