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Household Labor Supply Effects of Low-Wage Subsidies in Germany

Author

Listed:
  • Bonin, Holger

    () (IZA)

  • Kempe, Wolfram

    () (Deutsche Bundesbank)

  • Schneider, Hilmar

    () (IZA)

Abstract

This research evaluates the impact on German household labor supply of various subsidy schemes proposed to foster low-wage employment. Using data from the German Socio- Economic Panel, we estimate a discrete choice model of household labor supply. On the basis of the estimated labor supply parameters of husbands and wives, we simulate participation and hours effects of different policies raising low labor earnings at the individual and household levels. In all cases, the labor supply effect is very moderate. Subsidies to individuals promote part-time employment, in particular of second earners, while subsidies based on low household income drive the better qualified partner out of the labor market so that the total number of labor market participants even declines.

Suggested Citation

  • Bonin, Holger & Kempe, Wolfram & Schneider, Hilmar, 2002. "Household Labor Supply Effects of Low-Wage Subsidies in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 637, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp637
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Martijn P. Tummers & Isolde Woittiez, 1991. "A Simultaneous Wage and Labor Supply Model with Hours Restrictions," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(3), pages 393-423.
    2. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    3. Hausman, Jerry & Ruud, Paul, 1984. "Family Labor Supply with Taxes," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(2), pages 242-248, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    discrete choice; labor supply; low-wage subsidies; Germany;

    JEL classification:

    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy
    • J38 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Public Policy
    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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