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Gender and the Influence of Peer Alcohol Consumption on Adolescent Sexual Activity


  • Waddell, Glen R.

    () (University of Oregon)


I consider the alcohol consumption of opposite-gender peers as explanatory to adolescent sexual intercourse and demonstrate that female sexual activity is higher where there is higher alcohol consumption among male peers. This relationship is robust to school fixed effects, cannot be explained by broader cohort effects or general anti-social behaviors in male peer groups, and is distinctly different from any influence of the alcohol consumption of female peers which is shown to have no influence on female sexual activity. There is no evidence that male sexual activity responds to female-peer alcohol consumption.

Suggested Citation

  • Waddell, Glen R., 2010. "Gender and the Influence of Peer Alcohol Consumption on Adolescent Sexual Activity," IZA Discussion Papers 4880, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp4880

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Blog mentions

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    1. Peer alcohol consumption and adolescent sexual activity
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2010-05-24 18:29:00


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    Cited by:

    1. Eiji Yamamura, 2016. "Smokers’ Preference for Divorce and Extramarital Sex," Journal of Economics and Econometrics, Economics and Econometrics Society, vol. 59(2), pages 44-76.

    More about this item


    adolescent; sex; risky behavior; alcohol; peer;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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