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Oportunidades: Program Effect on Consumption, Low Participation, and Methodological Issues

Author

Listed:
  • Angelucci, Manuela

    () (University of Texas at Austin)

  • Attanasio, Orazio

    () (University College London)

Abstract

In this paper we estimate the effect of the Mexican conditional cash transfer program, Oportunidades, on consumption, and we explore some issues related to participation to the program and to the estimation of treatment effects. We discuss the comparability of treatment and control areas, provide evidence that the expected transfer may not be sufficiently high to induce many eligible households to participate, and find positive effects on consumption.

Suggested Citation

  • Angelucci, Manuela & Attanasio, Orazio, 2009. "Oportunidades: Program Effect on Consumption, Low Participation, and Methodological Issues," IZA Discussion Papers 4475, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp4475
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James J. Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Petra E. Todd, 1997. "Matching As An Econometric Evaluation Estimator: Evidence from Evaluating a Job Training Programme," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(4), pages 605-654.
    2. Hoddinott, John & Skoufias, Emmanuel, 2004. "The Impact of PROGRESA on Food Consumption," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(1), pages 37-61, October.
    3. Angelucci, Manuela & Attanasio, Orazio, 2006. "Estimating ATT Effects with Non-Experimental Data and Low Compliance," IZA Discussion Papers 2368, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Howard S. Bloom, 1984. "Accounting for No-Shows in Experimental Evaluation Designs," Evaluation Review, , vol. 8(2), pages 225-246, April.
    5. Manuela Angelucci & Giacomo De Giorgi, 2009. "Indirect Effects of an Aid Program: How Do Cash Transfers Affect Ineligibles' Consumption?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(1), pages 486-508, March.
    6. Imbens, Guido W & Angrist, Joshua D, 1994. "Identification and Estimation of Local Average Treatment Effects," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(2), pages 467-475, March.
    7. Pedro Albarran & Orazio P. Attanasio, 2003. "Limited Commitment and Crowding out of Private Transfers: Evidence from a Randomised Experiment," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(486), pages 77-85, March.
    8. Paul Schultz, T., 2004. "School subsidies for the poor: evaluating the Mexican Progresa poverty program," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 199-250, June.
    9. Paul J. Gertler & Sebastian W. Martinez & Marta Rubio-Codina, 2012. "Investing Cash Transfers to Raise Long-Term Living Standards," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(1), pages 164-192, January.
    10. Manski, Charles F & Lerman, Steven R, 1977. "The Estimation of Choice Probabilities from Choice Based Samples," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 45(8), pages 1977-1988, November.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Mauricio Moura & Rodrigo Bueno, 2014. "The Effect of Land Title on Child Labor Supply: Empirical Evidence from Brazil," Research in Labor Economics,in: Factors Affecting Worker Well-being: The Impact of Change in the Labor Market, volume 40, pages 195-222 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    2. Jere R. Behrman & Jorge Gallardo-García & Susan W. Parker & Petra E. Todd & Viviana Vélez-Grajales, 2012. "Are conditional cash transfers effective in urban areas? Evidence from Mexico," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 233-259, February.
    3. Orazio P. Attanasio & Costas Meghir & Ana Santiago & Andrew Shephard, 2009. "Improving the Education Component of Conditional Cash Transfers in Urban Settings," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 9313, Inter-American Development Bank.
    4. Orazio P. Attanasio & Valérie Lechene, 2014. "Efficient Responses to Targeted Cash Transfers," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 122(1), pages 178-222.
    5. Marcos E. Domínguez Viera, 2011. "Does the Impact of Oportunidades Program Increases in Highly Competitive Regions?," Ensayos Revista de Economia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Economia, vol. 0(2), pages 79-111, November.
    6. Ryan Nehring, 2012. "Linking Social Protection and Agricultural Production: The Case of Mexico," Policy Research Brief 21, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
    7. Mauricio Moura & Caio Piza & Marcos Poplawski-Ribeiro, 2011. "The Distributive Effects of Land Titleon Labor Supply; Evidence From Brazil," IMF Working Papers 11/131, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Caio Piza & Mauricio José Serpa Barros de Moura, 2011. "How Does Land Title Affect Access to Credit? Empirical Evidence from an Emerging Economy," Working Paper Series 2211, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    9. Paul J. Gertler & Sebastian W. Martinez & Marta Rubio-Codina, 2012. "Investing Cash Transfers to Raise Long-Term Living Standards," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(1), pages 164-192, January.
    10. World Bank, 2011. "Work and Family : Latin American and Caribbean Women in Search of a New Balance
      [Trabajo & familia : mujeres de América Latina y el Caribe en busca de un nuevo equilibrio - Resumen ejecuivo (Vol. 2
      ," World Bank Other Operational Studies 12489, The World Bank.
    11. Wagner Kamakura & Jose Mazzon, 2015. "Measuring the Impact of a Conditional Cash Transfer Program on Consumption Behavior with Propensity Scoring," Customer Needs and Solutions, Springer;Institute for Sustainable Innovation and Growth (iSIG), vol. 2(4), pages 302-316, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    matching; consumption; program evaluation; Oportunidades;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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