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Working Beyond 65 in Ireland

Author

Listed:
  • Nolan, Anne

    () (ESRI, Dublin)

  • Barrett, Alan

    () (ESRI, Dublin)

Abstract

Extending working lives is often proposed as one route through which the costs associated with population ageing can be managed. In that context, understanding who currently works for longer can help policymakers to design policies to facilitate longer working. In particular, it is important to know if longer working is a choice or a necessity, where necessity arises from a lack of pension income. In this paper, we use data from the first four waves of the Irish Longitudinal Study of Ageing (TILDA), covering the period 2010-2016, to examine patterns of labour force participation among men and women aged 65+. We find that a lack of pension income is an important determinant of later-life working and that this applies for both men and women. Although older women are significantly less likely to work than older men, we find few differences in the pattern of determinants of longer working among older men and women. However, while women are significantly less likely to work than men, this effect is stronger among married women compared to single women. This suggests that older women without immediate access to family-provided financial support may need to work to support themselves. This adds to the picture of later life work being a necessity as opposed to a choice. However, an alternative explanation is that older married women may also have caring responsibilities that reduce their labour force participation.

Suggested Citation

  • Nolan, Anne & Barrett, Alan, 2018. "Working Beyond 65 in Ireland," IZA Discussion Papers 11664, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11664
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Courtney Coile & Kevin Milligan & David A. Wise, 2016. "Health Capacity to Work at Older Ages: Evidence from the United States," NBER Chapters,in: Social Security Programs and Retirement Around the World: The Capacity to Work at Older Ages, pages 359-394 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    retirement; pensions; older workers; Ireland;

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J14 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of the Elderly; Economics of the Handicapped; Non-Labor Market Discrimination
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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