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Women Working Longer: Facts and Some Explanations

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  • Claudia Goldin
  • Lawrence F. Katz

Abstract

American women are working more, through their sixties and even into their seventies. Their increased participation at older ages started in the late 1980s before the turnaround in older men’s labor force participation and the economic downturns of the 2000s. The higher labor force participation of older women consists disproportionately of those working at full-time jobs. Increased labor force participation of women in their older ages is part of the general increase in cohort labor force participation. Cohort effects, in turn, are mainly a function of educational advances and greater prior work experience. But labor force participation rates of the most recent cohorts in their forties are less than those for previous cohorts. It would appear that employment at older ages could stagnate or even decrease. But several other factors will be operating in an opposing direction leading us to conclude that women are likely to continue to work even longer.

Suggested Citation

  • Claudia Goldin & Lawrence F. Katz, 2016. "Women Working Longer: Facts and Some Explanations," NBER Working Papers 22607, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:22607
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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Women Working Longer: Facts and Some Explanations
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2016-09-28 23:35:20

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J26 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Retirement; Retirement Policies

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