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Working Time Flexibility and Parental 'Quality Time' Spent with Children

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  • Magda, Iga

    () (Warsaw School of Economics)

  • Keister, Roma

    () (Institute for Structural Research (IBS))

Abstract

The aim of our paper is to analyse the relationship between working time flexibility and parental time devoted to children. Using data from a large panel survey of Polish households carried out in 2013 and 2014 (Determinants of Educational Decisions Household Panel Survey, UDE) we investigate whether and how various dimensions of working time flexibility affect the amount of time parents spend with their children reading, playing or teaching them new things. We account for employment status of parents, their socio-economic status and social and cultural norms they share. Our results show that employment status of parents and their working time arrangements are not statistically significant for the amount of parental 'quality time' devoted to children. We show that these are parental human and cultural capital and their values that are primary factors determining the amount of parental time investments.

Suggested Citation

  • Magda, Iga & Keister, Roma, 2018. "Working Time Flexibility and Parental 'Quality Time' Spent with Children," IZA Discussion Papers 11507, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11507
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Carneiro, Pedro & Ginja, Rita, 2012. "Partial Insurance and Investments in Children," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2012:22, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    2. Mario Fiorini & Michael P. Keane, 2014. "How the Allocation of Children's Time Affects Cognitive and Noncognitive Development," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(4), pages 787-836.
    3. Francesconi, Marco & Heckman, James J., 2016. "Symposium on Child Development and Parental Investment: Introduction," IZA Discussion Papers 9977, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Anna Matysiak & Dorota Węziak-Białowolska, 2016. "Country-Specific Conditions for Work and Family Reconciliation: An Attempt at Quantification," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(4), pages 475-510, October.
    5. Mehmet Soytas & Limor Golan & George-Levi Gayle, 2014. "What Accounts for the Racial Gap in Time Allocation and Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital?," 2014 Meeting Papers 83, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    6. Shelley Haddock & Toni Zimmerman & Kevin Lyness & Scott Ziemba, 2006. "Practices of Dual Earner Couples Successfully Balancing Work and Family," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 207-234, June.
    7. Anne Roeters, 2013. "Cross-National Differences in the Association Between Parental Work Hours and Time with Children in Europe: A Multilevel Analysis," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 110(2), pages 637-658, January.
    8. Barry R. Chiswick, 1988. "Differences in Education and Earnings Across Racial and Ethnic Groups: Tastes, Discrimination, and Investments in Child Quality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 103(3), pages 571-597.
    9. Suzanne Bianchi, 2000. "Maternal employment and time with children: Dramatic change or surprising continuity?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 37(4), pages 401-414, November.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    working time flexibility; parental time investments; child care; 'quality time with children';

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J81 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Working Conditions

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