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International Business Cycles with Mutliple Input Investment Technologies

  • Oviedo, P. Marcelo
  • Singh, Rajesh
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    Backus, Kehoe, and Kydland (International Real Business Cycles, JPE, 100 (4), 1992) documented several discrepancies between the observed post-war business cycles of developed countries and the predictions of a two-country, complete-market model. The main discrepancy dubbed as the quantity anomaly, that cross-country consumption correlations are higher than that of output in the model as opposed to the data, has remained a central puzzle in international economics. The main thesis of this paper is that when the standard two-country model with traded and non-traded goods and complete ¯nancial markets, as in Stockman and Tesar (Tastes and Technology in a Two Country Model of the Business Cycles: Explaining International Comovements, 85 (1), AER, 1995) is extended to include capital goods sectors that utilize both traded and non-traded goods as intermediates, and when the non-traded aggregate is reclassi¯ed to include distribution and transportation services, the model produces the correct ordering of the cross-country correlations of consumption and output.

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    File URL: http://www.econ.iastate.edu/sites/default/files/publications/papers/p12800-2011-04-30.pdf
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    Paper provided by Iowa State University, Department of Economics in its series Staff General Research Papers with number 32800.

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    Date of creation: 31 Mar 2008
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    Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:32800
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Iowa State University, Dept. of Economics, 260 Heady Hall, Ames, IA 50011-1070
    Phone: +1 515.294.6741
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    Web page: http://www.econ.iastate.edu
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    1. AMBLER, Steve & CARDIA, Emanuela & ZIMMERMANN, Christian, 2000. "International Transmission of the Business Cycle in a Multi-Sector Model," Cahiers de recherche 2000-06, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
    2. Timothy J. Kehoe & Kim J. Ruhl, 2007. "Are shocks to the terms of trade shocks to productivity?," Staff Report 391, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    3. Stockman, Alan C & Tesar, Linda L, 1995. "Tastes and Technology in a Two-Country Model of the Business Cycle: Explaining International Comovements," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(1), pages 168-85, March.
    4. Burstein, Ariel Tomas & Neves, Joao C & Rebelo, Sérgio, 2001. "Distribution Costs and Real Exchange Rate Dynamics During Exchange-Rate-Based Stabilization," CEPR Discussion Papers 2944, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Linda S. Goldberg & José Manuel Campa, 2006. "Distribution Margins, Imported Inputs, and the Sensitivity of the CPI to Exchange Rates," NBER Working Papers 12121, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Kollmann, Robert, 1996. "Incomplete asset markets and the cross-country consumption correlation puzzle," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 945-961, May.
    7. Backus, David K. & Smith, Gregor W., 1993. "Consumption and real exchange rates in dynamic economies with non-traded goods," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3-4), pages 297-316, November.
    8. Corsetti, Giancarlo & Dedola, Luca, 2005. "A macroeconomic model of international price discrimination," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 129-155, September.
    9. Corsetti, Giancarlo & Dedola, Luca & Leduc, Sylvain, 2004. "International risk-sharing and the transmission of productivity shocks," Working Paper Series 0308, European Central Bank.
    10. Michael R. Pakko, 1996. "International risk sharing and low cross-country consumption correlations: are they really inconsistent?," Working Papers 1994-019, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    11. Jonathan Heathcote & Fabrizio Perri, 2003. "Why Has the U.S. Economy Become Less Correlated with the Rest of the World?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(2), pages 63-69, May.
    12. Timothy J. Kehoe & Kim Ruhl, 2008. "Data Appendix to "Are Shocks to the Terms of Trade Shocks to Productivity?"," Technical Appendices 07-40, Review of Economic Dynamics.
    13. Michael A. Kouparitsas, 1996. "North-South financial integration and business cycles," Working Paper Series, Macroeconomic Issues WP-96-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    14. Mendoza, Enrique G, 1995. "The Terms of Trade, the Real Exchange Rate, and Economic Fluctuations," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 36(1), pages 101-37, February.
    15. Rudolfs Bems, 2008. "Aggregate Investment Expenditureson Tradable and Nontradable Goods," IMF Working Papers 08/45, International Monetary Fund.
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