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Debt- Versus Equity-Financing in Auction Designs

  • Zheng, Charles Zhoucheng

�A social planner wishes to launch a project but the contenders capable of running the project are cash-constrained and may default. �To signal their capabilities, the contenders may finance their bids through debt or equity, depending on the mechanism chosen by the social planner. �When moral hazard is absent, it is established as theorems that the ex post efficient social choice function cannot be achieved by any mechanism using only debt financing and can be achieved by a mechanism using equity financing. �When moral hazard is present, however, it is illustrated heuristically that equity share discourages effort and exacerbates default more than risky debt does.

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File URL: http://www.econ.iastate.edu/sites/default/files/publications/papers/p11517-2010-05-18.pdf
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Paper provided by Iowa State University, Department of Economics in its series Staff General Research Papers with number 31517.

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Date of creation: 18 May 2010
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Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:31517
Contact details of provider: Postal: Iowa State University, Dept. of Economics, 260 Heady Hall, Ames, IA 50011-1070
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Web page: http://www.econ.iastate.edu
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  1. Waehrer Keith, 1995. "A Model of Auction Contracts with Liquidated Damages," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 531-555, December.
  2. Che, Yeon-Koo & Gale, Ian, 1998. "Standard Auctions with Financially Constrained Bidders," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(1), pages 1-21, January.
  3. Maskin, Eric S., 2000. "Auctions, development, and privatization: Efficient auctions with liquidity-constrained buyers," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 44(4-6), pages 667-681, May.
  4. Matthew Rhodes-Kropf & S. Viswanathan, 2005. "Financing Auction Bids," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 36(4), pages 789-815, Winter.
  5. Simon Board, 2007. "Bidding into the Red: A Model of Post-Auction Bankruptcy," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 62(6), pages 2695-2723, December.
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