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Did the FED Inflate a Housing Price Bubble? A Cointegration Analysis between the 1980s and the 1990s


  • Clemente De Lucia

    (BNP Paribas, Paris, France)


The aim of this work is to verify if the recent episodes of expansionary policies followed by the FED contributed to the creation a housing price bubble. This study compares two different samples, both including periods of recession followed by accommodating monetary policies. The paper showed that even though the long-run relationship between inflation and the interest rate did not change along the whole sample, suggesting an unaltered behavior of the central bank with respect to changes in inflation, the reactivity of housing prices to monetary policy has considerably augmented during the 1990s compared to the 1980s. This is interpreted as evidence that prolonged accommodating monetary policies affected the US real estate market.

Suggested Citation

  • Clemente De Lucia, 2007. "Did the FED Inflate a Housing Price Bubble? A Cointegration Analysis between the 1980s and the 1990s," ISAE Working Papers 82, ISTAT - Italian National Institute of Statistics - (Rome, ITALY).
  • Handle: RePEc:isa:wpaper:82

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. G. Coenen & J.-L. Vega, 2001. "The demand for M3 in the euro area," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(6), pages 727-748.
    2. Charles Bean, 2003. "Asset Prices, Financial Imbalances and Monetary Policy: Are Inflation Targets Enough?," RBA Annual Conference Volume,in: Anthony Richards & Tim Robinson (ed.), Asset Prices and Monetary Policy Reserve Bank of Australia.
    3. Yock Y. Chong & David F. Hendry, 1986. "Econometric Evaluation of Linear Macro-Economic Models," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(4), pages 671-690.
    4. Barry Eichengreen, 2010. "Global Imbalances and the Lessons of Bretton Woods," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262514141, January.
    5. Christoph Duenwald, 2000. "Property Prices and Speculative Bubbles; Evidence From Hong Kong SAR," IMF Working Papers 00/2, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Jonathan McCarthy & Richard Peach, 2002. "Monetary policy transmission to residential investment," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue May, pages 139-158.
    7. Matteo Iacoviello & Raoul Minetti, 2003. "Financial Liberalization And The Sensitivity Of House Prices To Monetary Policy: Theory And Evidence," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 71(1), pages 20-34, January.
    8. Favero, Carlo A., 2001. "Applied Macroeconometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198296850.
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    More about this item


    Housing Price Bubble; Monetary Policy; Cointegration;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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