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Is it all about Money? A Randomized Evaluations of the Impact of Insurance Literacy and Marketing Treatments on the Demand for Health Microinsurance in Senegal

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  • BONAN Jacopo
  • DAGNELIE Olivier
  • LEMAY-BOUCHER Philippe
  • TENIKUE Michel

Abstract

In Senegal mutual health organizations (MHOs) have been present in the greater region of Thiès for years. Despite their benefits, in some areas there remain low take-up rates. We offer an insurance literacy module, communicating the benefits from health microinsurance and the functioning of MHOs, to a randomly selected sample of households in the city of Thiès. The effects of this training, and three cross-cutting marketing treatments, are evaluated using a randomized control trial. We find that the insurance literacy module has no impact, but that our marketing treatment has a significant effect on the take up decisions of households.

Suggested Citation

  • BONAN Jacopo & DAGNELIE Olivier & LEMAY-BOUCHER Philippe & TENIKUE Michel, 2012. "Is it all about Money? A Randomized Evaluations of the Impact of Insurance Literacy and Marketing Treatments on the Demand for Health Microinsurance in Senegal," LISER Working Paper Series 2012-03, LISER.
  • Handle: RePEc:irs:cepswp:2012-03
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Seiro ITO & Hisaki KONO, 2010. "Why Is The Take-Up Of Microinsurance So Low? Evidence From A Health Insurance Scheme In India," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 48(1), pages 74-101.
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    4. Xavier Giné & Robert Townsend & James Vickery, 2007. "Statistical Analysis of Rainfall Insurance Payouts in Southern India," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 89(5), pages 1248-1254.
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    6. Maarten Voors & Eleonora Nillesen & Philip Verwimp & Erwin Bulte & Robert Lensink & Daan van Soest, 2010. "Does Conflict affect Preferences? Results from Field Experiments in Burundi," HiCN Working Papers 71, Households in Conflict Network.
    7. Christian Morrisson, 2002. "Health, Education and Poverty Reduction," OECD Development Centre Policy Briefs 19, OECD Publishing.
    8. Matthew Jowett, 2003. "Do informal risk sharing networks crowd out public voluntary health insurance? Evidence from Vietnam," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(10), pages 1153-1161.
    9. Fafchamps, Marcel & Lund, Susan, 2003. "Risk-sharing networks in rural Philippines," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 261-287, August.
    10. Dean S. Karlan, 2005. "Using Experimental Economics to Measure Social Capital and Predict Financial Decisions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 1688-1699.
    11. Xavier Giné & Robert Townsend & James Vickery, 2008. "Patterns of Rainfall Insurance Participation in Rural India," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 22(3), pages 539-566, October.
    12. Smith, Kimberly V. & Sulzbach, Sara, 2008. "Community-based health insurance and access to maternal health services: Evidence from three West African countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 66(12), pages 2460-2473, June.
    13. Rebecca L. Thornton & Laurel E. Hatt & Erica M. Field & Mursaleena Islam & Freddy Solís Diaz & Martha Azucena González, 2010. "Social security health insurance for the informal sector in Nicaragua: a randomized evaluation," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(S1), pages 181-206, September.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. What happened to the microinsurance revolution?
      by UDADISI in udadisi on 2012-02-20 09:19:00

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    1. repec:pdc:jrnbeh:v:13:y:2017:i:2:p:182-191 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Jacopo Bonan & Philippe LeMay-Boucher & Michel Tenikue, 2014. "Households' Willingness to Pay for Health Microinsurance and its Impact on Actual Take-up: Results from a Field Experiment in Senegal," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(10), pages 1445-1462, November.
    3. Martin Eling & Shailee Pradhan & Joan T Schmit, 2014. "The Determinants of Microinsurance Demand," The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan;The Geneva Association, vol. 39(2), pages 224-263, April.
    4. El Aida, Kawtar & El Kadiri, Mounir & Mourji, Fouzi, 2015. "The demand for health microinsurance services: assessment of the contribution effort using microeconomic data," MPRA Paper 68470, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. BONAN Jacopo & LEMAY-BOUCHER Philippe & SCOTT Douglas & TENIKUE Michel, 2015. "Increasing anti-malaria bednets uptake using information and distribution strategies," LISER Working Paper Series 2015-03, LISER.
    6. Bonan, Jacopo & LeMay-Boucher, Philippe & Tenikue, Michel, 2016. "Increasing Anti-Malaria Bednet Uptake Using Information and Distribution Strategies: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in Senegal," MITP: Mitigation, Innovation,and Transformation Pathways 249787, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
    7. BONAN Jacopo & LEMAY-BOUCHER Philippe & SCOTT Douglas & TENIKUE Michel, 2017. "Can Hypothetical Time Discounting Rates Predict Actual Behaviour: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment," LISER Working Paper Series 2017-03, LISER.
    8. Platteau, Jean-Philippe & De Bock, Ombeline & Gelade, Wouter, 2017. "The Demand for Microinsurance: A Literature Review," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 139-156.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    community based health insurance scheme; Randomized control trials; Africa; Senegal;

    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements

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